The New York Times Book of Health

The New York Times Book of Health

by Jane E. Brody, the New York Times
     
 

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To Your Health!

Recognizing that consumers sometimes feel overwhelmed by the relentless and often conflicting stream of medical reports, New York Times health reporter Jane E. Brody and her colleagues distill the information you really need from current findings, present balanced assessments of often contradictory medical advice, and offer

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Overview

To Your Health!

Recognizing that consumers sometimes feel overwhelmed by the relentless and often conflicting stream of medical reports, New York Times health reporter Jane E. Brody and her colleagues distill the information you really need from current findings, present balanced assessments of often contradictory medical advice, and offer sensible guidelines that won't go out of date overnight. Some of the pressing—and puzzling—questions they cover include:

GOOD HEALTH VERSUS BAD HABITS
* What are the "seven deadly sins" that sabotage good health?

WHY WEIGHT GAIN IS HEALTH'S LOSS
* Which newly identified hormone helps set our weight?

THE MANY BENEFITS OF EXERCISE
* Which is better—running or swimming?
* Is moderate exercise really good enough?

THE SCIENCE OF EATING RIGHT
* What do we really know about fat and health?
* Can drinking alcohol help your health?

VITAMINS AND OTHER SUPPLEMENTS
* Is beta-carotene a washout?

PROTECTING THE HEART
* How does heart disease differ for men and women?
* Does testosterone protect our hearts?

AVERTING CANCER RISKS
* How do we interpret the new genetics of breast cancer?

STAGES OF LIFE
* Does fetal monitoring make any difference?
* Do children really need low-fat diets?
* What do we really know about hormone replacement?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In an attempt to present the latest scientific information and make sense of often confusing research findings, editor Wade has selected over 100 recent (since January 1993) articles by New York Times reporters and arranged them into broad categories. These include health habits, weight, exercise, nutrition, food supplements, cancer and heart disease. The book is additionally broken down into sections that address four stages of life: pregnancy and birth; childhood; menopause; and aging. Brody is the principal contributor, with eight other reporters also represented. Unsigned introductions to the individual sections provide perspective on such troublesome issues as good and bad fats, the pros and cons of antioxidants, the relative value of moderate and vigorous exercise, and the risks and benefits of hormone-replacement therapy.

As Wade acknowledges and as these selections illustrate, science doesn't have clear answers to many of today's health questions. Research continues apace, and apparent discoveries are reversed, restored and revised with dizzying speed. Nevertheless, at the risk of information overload, some core truths emerge and balances are struck in this thorough volume.

Library Journal
Surely what we don't need is a consumer health book that consists of a compilation of popular news reports on the 'latest' findings in medical research -- or do we? In the introduction, New York Times health reporter Brody explains that the book's aim is to clarify what's behind the confusing and sometimes contradictory health findings. Having been made aware that disagreement among experts is neither unusual nor necessarily undesirable, readers are then able to read the following articles without undue impatience or insistence on definitive answers.

The articles, contributed by Brody and other Times writers from January 1993 to mid-1996, cover many of the health debates and preoccupations of our time, from weight loss, nutrition and exercise to heart disease and cancer prevention. Each chapter presents differing viewpoints and gives as much scrutiny to study design as study results. Perhaps a few concluding paragraphs might have served to reinforce the message in the introduction, but that is a minor flaw. -- Kay Hogan, University of Alabama at Birmingham

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780812930122
Publisher:
Random House, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
506
Product dimensions:
5.53(w) x 8.17(h) x 1.14(d)

Meet the Author

Jane E. Brody is the "Personal Health" columnist of The New York Times. She is the author of numerous bestselling books, including Jane Brody's Good Food Book and Jane Brody's Nutrition Book. She lives in New York City. The articles in this book were selected and organized by Nicholas Wade, until recently science editor at the Times.

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