The Next Battleground: Japan, America, and the New European Market

Overview

The economic battleground is about to change. For the past two decades, the intense conflict between America and Japan has been played out on U.S. soil, as Japanese companies have become dominant producers of cars, computers, and electronics. But now the European Community has become the world's largest market, and this new arena will be the site of an even more important competition with Japan. As Tim Jackson explains in this provocative book, Europe puts Japan and the United States on an equal footing for the ...
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1993 Hardcover New 395615941. New; 1 x 8.5 x 5.5 Inches; 332 pages.

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Overview

The economic battleground is about to change. For the past two decades, the intense conflict between America and Japan has been played out on U.S. soil, as Japanese companies have become dominant producers of cars, computers, and electronics. But now the European Community has become the world's largest market, and this new arena will be the site of an even more important competition with Japan. As Tim Jackson explains in this provocative book, Europe puts Japan and the United States on an equal footing for the first time. Both will now have to operate on foreign territory; both will have to do business in unfamiliar languages and adjust to complex regulations of someone else's devising. A few of America's largest companies have well-established operations in Europe, but the recent flood of Japanese investments suggests that Japan is already moving quickly to adapt its dynamic economic philosophy to this huge new market. Many companies in the United States - and in Europe itself - will have to hurry to catch up. But this is a story about people as well as companies, and in these pages we meet American, Japanese, and European managers as they struggle to understand a whole new set of problems and opportunities. Jackson focuses on four businesses - banking, automobiles, computers, and electronics - as a way to explore the dimensions of this three-cornered conflict. Gradually, the essential questions become clear: has American business learned the right lessons from its recent conflict with Japan, and can we now enter the European battleground as a stronger and wiser competitor? Combining incisive analysis with colorful reportage from three continents, Tim Jackson takes us inside the Japanese juggernaut and a range of global industries to demonstrate the breadth and complexity of the challenge we face. The stakes are high: how well U.S. businesses respond will have lasting implications for the American economy.

The battleground is about to change. Over the past two decades, the economic conflict between the United States and Japan has been played out on American soil. But now Europe is fast becoming the world's largest market, and this new arena will be the site of an even more intense competition with Japan.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Fierce competition lies ahead as American, Japanese and European firms slug it out in what promises to be the world's largest market, a unified Europe. Jackson, once the Tokyo correspondent for the Economist and now the Independent 's Brussels bureau chief, predicts that while Japan's banks and stock brokerages pose no threat to Europe, the European auto industry is likely to undergo a bloodbath of sorts as Japanese firms attack the mass market, then move on to invade the luxury car business. In the computer industry, according to Jackson, Japanese advantages will come to weigh more heavily as computers, more and more, become off-the-shelf goods. Using the restructuring of Philips N.V. as a case study, he argues that European consumer electronics firms can still revive their fortunes. Overall, Japanese companies are not unbeatable, Jackson stresses. His well-grounded analysis of the strengths and weaknesses that U.S., Japanese and European companies bring to the marketplace makes his trenchant, crisply written report crucial reading for managers facing a new arena. (Feb.)
David Rouse
The implications of European economic unification are beginning to be reflected in headlines warning of a possible transatlantic trade war. Jackson's perspective, though, is much broader. A journalist based in Tokyo for four years, first for the "Economist" and then for London's "Independent", he sees Japan as becoming an even more formidable global force. With massive investments in Europe over the last 10 years, the Japanese are poised to take full advantage of this new market, which has more consumers and economic output than either the U.S. or Japan. Jackson argues that U.S. companies like GM and Ford, which now depend on European profits to survive, will soon be hard-pressed to compete. He examines not only Europe's auto industry but its computers and consumer electronics as well, and he critiques the shortcomings of European industrial policy. Hope for the U.S., he suggests, lies in emphasizing such service sector industries as software. Jackson's thoughtful and original analysis belongs in larger business collections.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780395615942
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 2/22/1993
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.78 (w) x 8.53 (h) x 1.23 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
1 The World's Biggest Market 1
2 A Glimpse Inside the Japanese Miracle 37
3 The Long March of the Japanese Bank 72
4 Kill or Cure in the Car Business 108
5 Toshiba, Olivetti, and the European Computer 146
6 A Battle for the Future of Digital Audio 181
7 The Pitfalls of European Industrial Policy 213
8 The Reluctant Missionaries 250
Notes 299
Index 319
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