The Next Fine Day

( 1 )

Overview

Each spring for hundreds of years, the herons have returned to Chilham, England, but only now have they become important to Kent. Their departure this fall marks the beginning of a new life for his mother, who has closed her heart to love, and for Kent, who thinks of himself as Nobody.

"Each spring for hundreds of years, the herons have returned to Chilham, England, but only now have they become important to Kent. Their departure this fall marks the beginning of a new life for his mother, who has ...

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Overview

Each spring for hundreds of years, the herons have returned to Chilham, England, but only now have they become important to Kent. Their departure this fall marks the beginning of a new life for his mother, who has closed her heart to love, and for Kent, who thinks of himself as Nobody.

"Each spring for hundreds of years, the herons have returned to Chilham, England, but only now have they become important to Kent. Their departure this fall marks the beginning of a new life for his mother, who has closed her heart to love, and for Kent, who thinks of himself as Nobody."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780890847350
  • Publisher: Jones, Bob University Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/1994
  • Series: Pennant Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 150
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 940L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Lone Flyer 1
2. The Mulberry 13
3. Two Compositions 25
4. Pilgrims' Way 37
5. The Long Arm of the Past 49
6. Lengthening Yule 57
7. The Ash Is Still Warm 75
8. Winter's Hold 87
9. With Heart and Hand 103
10. Return of the Herons 111
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  • Posted June 19, 2013

    Eleven-year-old Kent Conner lives with his mother Maidey in the

    Eleven-year-old Kent Conner lives with his mother Maidey in the small village of Chilham where each spring, for hundreds of year, the herons have returned. It is in southern England, on the River Stour in the county of Kent, not far from Canterbury where Maidey works as a housekeeper. His father, also named Kent Conner, was an American serviceman from Virginia who was stationed at Lympne in England, married Maidey, and then was killed in an accident when Kent was just four. As a result of their loss, Maidey has closed her heart to love and Kent, though he does well in school, thinks of himself as Nobody. Mr. Conner’s body is buried in the local churchyard, but Maidey never goes there.

    Then, one fall, into their lives comes an artist named John Rivven, who has moved into Beekeep, a formerly vacant cottage in Chilham. He meets Kent when the boy is walking home from school and starts telling him all kinds of stories about the herons, the ancient Britons, and the local mulberry trees which were the source for mulberry trees planted in Virginia. He keeps asking Kent to meet him again “the next fine day.” Later he invites Kent and Maidey to share Christmas dinner with him. After the first of the year, John leaves to follow the herons to Africa but promises to return. Maidey receives a mysterious letter from him and begins talking about quitting her job and moving away from Chilham. Following that she becomes very ill. Why did Maidey react to the letter in the way she did? What will happen to her and Kent? And when the herons return, will they bring good fortune or bad?

    We dearly love the books of Elizabeth Yates (December 6, 1905 – July 29, 2001). We have read her 1951 Newbery Medal winner Amos Fortune, Free Man, along with Sarah Whitcher’s Story, Patterns on the Wall (or The Journeyman), and Hue and Cry. I also want to read her Mountain Born, Carolina’s Courage, and With Pipe, Paddle, and Song. I recall seeing an interview with her prior to her death, I think in Homeschooling Today magazine; I believe that her daughter homeschooled her children. Besides the fact that The Next Fine Day is a wonderful story that is told remarkably well, I liked the fact that the Conners are said to attend church services. Also, John Riven reminds Kent that “The heron is part of an ancient pattern given us by the Creator” and that “God fitted them into nature’s plan and linked them with the orderly procedure.”

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