The Next Generation in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan: Youth, Politics, Identity, and Change

The Next Generation in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan: Youth, Politics, Identity, and Change

by Nadia M. Diuk
     
 

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In the past twenty years, the countries that used to make up the former Soviet Union have seen plenty of change. There have been revolutions, youth-led protest movements, and other forms of incredible political upheaval. At the center of all of this were young leaders fighting to be heard and clamoring for change. In Nadia Diuk's meticulously researched and

Overview

In the past twenty years, the countries that used to make up the former Soviet Union have seen plenty of change. There have been revolutions, youth-led protest movements, and other forms of incredible political upheaval. At the center of all of this were young leaders fighting to be heard and clamoring for change. In Nadia Diuk's meticulously researched and insightful book. The Next Generation in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan, she shows how those young leaders have risen up and become a part of the new political system. Using unique public opinion polling data and personal interviews, she explores how the new generation of leaders is shaping the political system and how the young people of today continue to exhort pressure for reform. This book is important to anyone interested in Eastern European studies, political transitions, protest movements, or youth and politics.

Editorial Reviews

Choice
Diuk (vice president, National Endowment of Democracy) analyzes the political attitudes of youth (18-35 year olds) in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan, based on surveys conducted in 2003 and 2010. In Soviet times, youth activities were channeled into official organizations. In post-Soviet society, they are untethered, despite some efforts by the Russian state to create Komsomol-like organizations. Diuk argues that youth have better skills and work ethics than their parents have but still expect the state to provide a safety net. They do not necessarily hold democratic values—not even in Ukraine, where they played a prominent role in the 2004 Orange Revolution. They are alienated from politics, with low levels of trust in the media, parties, and NG's. The highest level of support for democracy (as an ideal) is in Azerbaijan, which is the least democratic of the three. The 40-page appendix includes the main survey results: Diuk does not construct a statistical model. One of the few books on an important topic. Summing Up: Recommended.
Francis Fukuyama
Using new polling data, Nadia Diuk traces youth attitudes towards politics in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan, and shows how they have been shaped in ways very different from one another by their past experiences. The Next Generation will be critical to anyone seeking to understand political change in the former Soviet Union.
Zbigniew Brzezinski
A timely and important contribution regarding the complex relationship between democracy and the politically-awakened youth of the key newly independent states of the former Soviet space.
Larry Diamond
One of the most striking features of recent democratic revolutions in post-communist countries (and globally) has been the leading role of youth and youth movements in challenging authoritarian rule. But what happens after the revolution? In this innovative and timely study, Nadia Diuk draws on extensive interviews and public opinion surveys to paint a fascinating political portrait of the first post-Soviet generation in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan. This is a vital work for understanding the nature and limits of political change in these societies.
CHOICE
Diuk (vice president, National Endowment of Democracy) analyzes the political attitudes of youth (18-35 year olds) in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan, based on surveys conducted in 2003 and 2010. In Soviet times, youth activities were channeled into official organizations. In post-Soviet society, they are untethered, despite some efforts by the Russian state to create Komsomol-like organizations. Diuk argues that youth have better skills and work ethics than their parents have but still expect the state to provide a safety net. They do not necessarily hold democratic values—not even in Ukraine, where they played a prominent role in the 2004 Orange Revolution. They are alienated from politics, with low levels of trust in the media, parties, and NG's. The highest level of support for democracy (as an ideal) is in Azerbaijan, which is the least democratic of the three. The 40-page appendix includes the main survey results: Diuk does not construct a statistical model. One of the few books on an important topic. Summing Up: Recommended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442213739
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
04/12/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
226
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Nadia M. Diuk is the Vice President of programs in Africa, Europe, and Eurasia, Latin American, and Caribbean for the National Endowment for Democracy. She is the author of Hidden Nations and New Nations Rising.

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