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The Nile Tributaries of Abyssinia, and the Sword Hunters of the Hamran Arabs
     

The Nile Tributaries of Abyssinia, and the Sword Hunters of the Hamran Arabs

by Samuel White Baker
 
General Books publication date: 2009
Original publication date: 1868
Original Publisher: Macmillan Subjects: Nile River

Ethiopia

History / Africa / General

History / Africa / Central

History / Africa / East

History / Ancient / Egypt

History / Middle East / Egypt

History / Middle East / General

Travel / Africa / General Notes:

Overview

General Books publication date: 2009
Original publication date: 1868
Original Publisher: Macmillan Subjects: Nile River

Ethiopia

History / Africa / General

History / Africa / Central

History / Africa / East

History / Ancient / Egypt

History / Middle East / Egypt

History / Middle East / General

Travel / Africa / General Notes: This is a black and white OCR reprint of the original. It has no illustrations and there may be typos or missing text.
When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free.
Excerpt: CHAPTE IV. ROUTE FROM CASSALA TO SOUAKIM. By dead reckoning, Cassala is ninety-three miles S. S. E. of Gozerajup, or about 340 miles from Berber. We had ridden about 710 miles from Korosko, 630 miles of which had been through scorching deserts during the hottest season. We were, therefore, thankful to exchange the intense heat of the tent for a solid roof, and to rest for a short time in the picturesque country of Taka. The direct route to Cassala, the capital of Taka, should be from Suez to Souakim, on the Red Sea, and from thence, in sixteen days, by camel. Thus, were there a line from Suez to Souakim by steamers, similar to that already established to Jedda, Cassala would be only twenty-two days' journey from Cairo. At present, the arrival of steamers at Souakim is entirely uncertain; therefore the trade of the country is paralysed by the apathy of the Egyptian Government. The Abdul Azziz Company run their steamers regularly from Suez to Jedda; and, although they advertise Souakim as a port of call, there is no dependence to be placed upon the announcement; therefore, all merchants are afraid not only of delay, but of highChap, iv.] FACILITIES OF THE PORT OF SOUAKIM. 71 warehouse charges at Souakim. The latter port is only four days' steaming from Suez, and, being the most central depot for all merchandise both to and from Upper Egypt, it w...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026989416
Publisher:
Macmillan and co.
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
958 KB

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