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Notorious Byrd Brothers
     

The Notorious Byrd Brothers

4.7 3
by The Byrds
 

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972383521
catalogNumber:
723835
Rank:
34228

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Byrds   Primary Artist
Clarence White   Guitar
Chris Hillman   Bass,Mandolin,Vocals,Various
Paul Beaver   Moog Synthesizer
Curt Boettcher   Background Vocals
Red Rhodes   Guitar
Jim Gordon   Drums
Michael Clarke   Drums
Roger McGuinn   Banjo,Guitar,Vocals,12-string Guitar

Technical Credits

Roy Halee   Engineer
Gary Usher   Producer,Audio Production
Johnny Rogan   Song Notes
David Fricke   Liner Notes
Bob Irwin   Producer
Don Thompson Quartet   Engineer
Jessica Sowin   Contributor,Associate Project Director
Don Thompson   Engineer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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The Notorious Byrd Brothers 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
glauver More than 1 year ago
This was the last gasp of the first Byrds. The album was recorded by guitarist Roger McGuinn, bassist Chris Hillman, and drummer Michael Clarke. David Crosby and Gene Clark may have been present at one time or another, but studio musicians fleshed out the instrumentation. The sessions were stormy. The atmosphere seems gloomy; listen closely to songs like Goin' Back, Artificial Energy, Draft Morning, and Space Odyssey. There is a hidden track at the end (I haven't bothered to listen) of an argument between Crosby and Clarke about drumming that showed how badly the group relationships had deteriorated. The bonus tracks are mostly mediocre. Only Crosby's Triad, an obnoxious plea for open relationships, makes an impression, and it is not a good one. I also notice that there are very few, if any, solo lead vocals on the original album; all the voices are multi-tracked. McGuinn formed later versions of The Byrds, but they were never as cutting edge as the 1965-68 group.