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The Notting Hill Mystery
     

The Notting Hill Mystery

3.5 2
by Charles Warren Adams
 

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Can you name the first detective novel ever published? For years, many believed it to be Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, published in 1868. Others speculated it might be Émile Gaboriau’s first Monsieur Lecoq novel, L’Affaire Lerouge. Actually, the firstmodern detective novel predates both of these by several years—Charles

Overview

Can you name the first detective novel ever published? For years, many believed it to be Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, published in 1868. Others speculated it might be Émile Gaboriau’s first Monsieur Lecoq novel, L’Affaire Lerouge. Actually, the firstmodern detective novel predates both of these by several years—Charles Warren Adams’s The Notting Hill Mystery, originally published as an eight-part serial in Once A Week magazine in 1862 under the pseudonym Charles Felix, then as a single-volume novel in 1863 by Bradbury & Evans, is considered to truly be the first.
            The Notting Hill Mystery begins in London, where the wife of the sinister Baron R__ dies after drinking from a bottle of acid, apparently while sleepwalking in her husband’s home laboratory. It looks like an accident, until insurance investigator Ralph Henderson learns that Baron R__ took out numerous life insurance policies on his wife. As Henderson investigates the case, he discovers not one, but three murders. Presented as Henderson’s evidential findings—diary entries, family letters, chemical analysis reports, interviews with witnesses, along with a crime scene map—the novel displays innovative techniques that would not become common features of detective fiction until the 1920s.
            To the delight of all fans of detective fiction, the British Library makes this landmark text available once again. This handsome new edition also includes George du Maurier’s illustrations, the first edition to do so since the original publication in serial form.
 

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
The book is both utterly of its time and utterly ahead of it.

— Paul Collins

Denver Post
[T]he mystery that started them all is as masterful as anything it inspired.”

 

— Sandra Dallas

New York Times Book Review - Paul Collins
“The book is both utterly of its time and utterly ahead of it.”

Denver Post - Sandra Dallas
“[T]he mystery that started them all is as masterful as anything it inspired.”

Telegraph - Julia Handford
“[T]he way [The Notting Hill Mystery] tells its bizarre tale of murder is astonishingly modern.”
London Review of Books - Alice Spawls
“Engrossing. . . . The Notting Hill Mystery follow[s] the epistolary tradition of police casebooks popular in the mid-nineteenth century, but in presenting the evidence systematically and showing the working of the detective, Adams hit[s] on something central to the detective mystery: the suspense created by revealing one narrative through another.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780712358590
Publisher:
British Library, The
Publication date:
04/15/2012
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.40(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Charles Warren Adams wrote under the pseudonym Charles Felix. He was a journalist, traveler, lawyer, and sole proprietor of the firm Saunders, Otley & Co., as well as the author of Barefooted Birdie and Velvet Lawn.

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The Notting Hill Mystery 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
druidgirl More than 1 year ago
This was a mystery that was never really solved,but it was attention grabbing. It was a narrative written through testimony given by various suspects and professionals. It took me a little longer to read but it was a good book. I received this in exchange for an honest review.
CoopCR More than 1 year ago
Almost post-modern in structure, The Notting Hill Mystery is not a page-turner in the ordinary sense, but rather an intellectualized approach to "proving" a murder has taken place. An insurance investigator presents the evidence he has gathered after the death of a richly insured woman.