The Numbers Dance: A Counting Comedy

Overview

Twirling and whirling, zigging and zagging, numerals dance across the pages, enticing children to play with numbers and develop a better understanding of numeric values in this fun and informative comic approach. Three groups of numerals make mightily concerted attempts to maintain the quirks of their distinct personalities in the face of persistent peer pressure. The irascible 1, 2, 3, and 4, though frail and wiry, would like to impose their ballroom dance style on the robust 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. 5 and 6 ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $10.03   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Twirling and whirling, zigging and zagging, numerals dance across the pages, enticing children to play with numbers and develop a better understanding of numeric values in this fun and informative comic approach. Three groups of numerals make mightily concerted attempts to maintain the quirks of their distinct personalities in the face of persistent peer pressure. The irascible 1, 2, 3, and 4, though frail and wiry, would like to impose their ballroom dance style on the robust 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. 5 and 6 cannot help reverting to raucous jazz dancing, no matter how hard they sportingly try to conform, and 7–10 don't see the point of being anything but what they truly are—western line dancers. Scuffles, rumbles, roundups, and coercions ensue until 1–4 have their way and 5–10 "go back to dancing like they want to, again!" The book's rousing, impeccably metered rhymes provide the cadence of each dance style, and the spare accompanying art lends a clean energy to the numerals' challenge to accept each other as they are.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The beautiful illustrations and rhythmic text are enchanting and will spark interesting conversations—not to mention dancing with sheer pleasure."  —ABA's BookSense Picks for Winter 2005-06

"It takes some lassoing to calm things down, and soon everyone is dancing to their own tune."  —Association of Booksellers for Children's "Best Books for Children" List

"Delightful and I am pleased to give it my highest endorsement."  —Mary Beth Farr, library development specialist, New York State Education Department 

Winner, Children's Choices Award, International Reading Association and the Children's Book Council

Shortlisted for the New York Library Association's Book of the Season, Fall 2005

ABA's Picks for Winter 2005
The beautiful illustrations and rhythmic text are enchanting and will spark interesting conversations-not to mention dancing with sheer pleasure.
Association of Booksellers for Children's "Best Books for Children" list
It takes some lassoing to calm things down, and soon everyone is dancing to their own tune.
Children's Literature
Dancing numbers certainly have possibilities as an idea for a book, but it seems doubtful that this large-format combination of awkward rhymes and jumbled numbers will appeal to young children. Although each page has a column at the side with the numbers in order, the main characters are locked in such intricate designs that counting does not seem to be the point. The allusions to various dances in the text (for example, waltz, jitterbug, shimmy, boogie, twist, reel) require a lot of explanation for young listeners. They will probably be somewhat bemused by lines like "7 and 8 shout out, 'Yahoo!'/then find themselves in a tight lasso/with 9 and 10, who've been rustled, too." Although there is movement on most of the pages, its not illustrative of the dances. The artist's mannered style and the objects scattered about are not likely to engage a young child's attention; the story's called a "counting comedy," but where is the fun? No doubt this concept was enjoyable for the author and artist to play with, but it ends up as the kind of arty book that is more interesting to adults than to children. 2005, Gingerbread House, Ages 3 to 6.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 4-A counting book that doesn't measure up. "And-a-1 And-a-2 And-a-3 And-a-4, Four dainty numbers waltz across the floor." As the numerals dance, the verses sketch the chaos that results from 5 and 6 (rumba and samba dancers) attempting to share the floor, followed by 7 through 10, who are enjoying country line dancing. The numbers, each of a slightly different design and color, border the right side of the spreads in small squares and tumble over the dance floor in larger form, colliding with each other. They try out one another's steps as order is restored and then they all go back to their own styles less boisterously. The verse does not flow naturally in structure or in rhythm, with "yahoo" made to rhyme with "lasso" and questionable words such as "crumped" and "rump" used to fit the rhyme scheme. In one place, the couplets become triplets. The digital illustrations, rendered from mixed media, have the look of minimalist collages, with largely white pages where the numbers, occasionally embellished by a prop, are cavorting. For a few pages, a background with wallpaper design is used. The general effect is not particularly appealing. The dance-floor milieu is unlikely to draw a preschool or primary-grade audience, and the book doesn't work as an exercise in artistic design for older children.-Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In an elegantly designed cousin to Bill Martin's Chicka Chicka 1,2,3 (2004), illustrated by Lois Ehlert, the numbers one to ten collide while trying to dance in different styles, creating chaos on the floor. Ziborova illustrates the melee-"1 gets knocked. / 2 gets socked. / 3 gets blocked. / With 4 who's rocked. / Even 5 and 6 feel shock, / Finding themselves in a strange head-lock"-with digitally reworked collages featuring big digits in different colors and typefaces tumbling across abstract fields of patterned fabric, printed papers and white space. The visuals work with the text's changing cadences to capture the wild confusion, if not a sense of what the dances actually look like, and harmony, of a sort, is restored at the end as all ten find ways to "Dance their OWN styles-like they want to-again." Still, this would work better with the letters actually in motion. Attention filmmakers! (Picture book. 6-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780940112117
  • Publisher: Gingerbread House
  • Publication date: 9/28/2005
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 5 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.75 (w) x 11.75 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Josephine Nobisso is the award-winning author of more than 20 children's books, including In English, of Course; Show; Don't Tell!, and The Weight of Mass, which were selected as American Bookseller Association Book Sense 76 Picks. She lives in Westhampton Beach, New York. Dasha Ziborova is the illustrator of Crispin the Terrible and In English, of Course. She is a website and children's computer games designer and a big-scale mural painter. She lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)