The Official Pocket Edible Plant Survival Manual [NOOK Book]

Overview

It doesn't take a genius to understand the one most important aspect of surviving. It's having access to drinkable water! Without water a person can't live more than three days.
The second most important thing is food! Men have been known to live more than a month without food. But there's absolutely no need for any person to be deprived of something to eat. Nature is and always has been a good and reliable provider. Everyone should know how to properly use her. Learn to live ...
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The Official Pocket Edible Plant Survival Manual

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Overview

It doesn't take a genius to understand the one most important aspect of surviving. It's having access to drinkable water! Without water a person can't live more than three days.
The second most important thing is food! Men have been known to live more than a month without food. But there's absolutely no need for any person to be deprived of something to eat. Nature is and always has been a good and reliable provider. Everyone should know how to properly use her. Learn to live off the land. It really isn't that difficult. This one-of-a-kind edible plant survival handbook tells you all you need to know.
CONTENTS
1. No One Should Ever Starve! 15
2. Cooking Wild Edible Plants 19
3. Wild Fruits and Berries 31
4. Wild Plants Used as Vegetables 49
5. Ferns as a Good Food Source 113
6. Trees an Excellent Food Supply 121
7. Always Avoid Mushrooms 139
8. Making Nourishing Tea 145
9. Identifying Edible Plants 151
10. Avoid Eating Poisonous Plants 247
11. Identifying Common Poisonous Plants 261
COOKING METHODS
BOIL: Put leaves or other plant parts in water and bring to boil. Continue boiling until tender -- usually 10 to 15 minutes or less. Boil in as little liquid as possible. Try to not overcook.
DEEP FRY: Drop plant parts in pot or kettle of very hot cooking oil sitting over a fire. This is how French fried potatoes and onion rings are cooked.
FRY: Lay batter coated or uncoated plant parts (sliced root, etc.) in greased frying pan and cook until browned.
SAUTE: Cook in hot, lightly greased frying pan, stirring until browned or tender.
SIMMER: Put leaves or other plant parts in near-boiling water and allow to simmer until tender.
STEAM: Put leaves, stems, or whatever you want to steam, in colander or strainer. Set over boiling water 5 to 10 minutes or until tender. Often the preferred way to cook greens.
STEEP: Put leaves or other plant parts in pot of boiling water. Take off stove and cover. Leave to steep for 10 to 20 minutes.
or Pour boiling water over crushed leaves in pot. Cover and steep 5 to 15 minutes when brewing sugar with every cup of water in pot.
Edible fruit is plentiful in nature and it supplies great food in a survival situation. You're no doubt already aware of many of the wild fruits and berries in the United States. However, to refresh your memory, all the following are readily available, easy to find and are meticulously covered in this chapter.
Blackberry Grapes
Blueberry Mulberry
Crabapple Persimmon
Elderberry Rhubarb
Serviceberry Strawberry
Various authorities estimate there are approximately 300,000 plants (those that have been classified) on the surface of the earth. Of these, 120,000 varieties have been determined to be edible.
A person should know what edible plants to look for when in the wilderness. He or she should also be able to properly identify these plants and to properly prepare them for eating.
Such an individual will undoubtedly find enough plant food out there to keep alive over an extended period of time. And he or she may even surprise themselves with a delicious meal.
Ferns are abundant in moist areas of all climates. They are especially easy to find. Look in gullies, on stream banks, in forested areas, along the sides of hiking trails and on the edge of woods.
Ferns, by and large, are a safe plant to cook and eat. Some are distastefully bitter and certainly not palatable. Yet, no fern is known to be poisonous.

The inner bark of some trees—the layer next to the wood—can be eaten raw or cooked. Avoid the outer bark. It contains large amounts of tannin and is extremely bitter.
Flour can be made by pulverizing the inner bark of a number of trees – aspen, birch, cottonwood, pine, slippery elm and willow.
One outstanding example of a tree food source is the pine.
The inner bark is high in vitamin C. The nuts, needles, twigs and sap are all edible. The nuts (eaten raw or roasted) grow in woody cones hanging near the tips of the branches. When mature, they fall out of the ripe cone.
SYRUP TREES
Certain kinds of trees are known to provide nourishing sap. They are invaluable to a person stranded in the wilderness who is desperately trying to stay alive. The sugar maple is the best known and most widely used source of sap for making sweet syrup and sugar. Others used for this are the birch, butternut, hickory and sycamore. Each has to be tapped and the sap collected in buckets or cans. The sap is then boiled down to syrup and further down if sugar is the desired end result. The sap from the above mentioned trees produce a syrup comparable to maple syrup.
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Editorial Reviews

Tom Dodge
“If Heartland USA had a ‘Seal of Approval,’ these books would surely carry one.”
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013382145
  • Publisher: Freedom & Liberty Foundation Press
  • Publication date: 9/16/2011
  • Series: Pelton's Pocket Survival Manuals , #2
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 315,019
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Robert W. Pelton is one of the most respected survival experts in the country. His series of four outstanding pocket survival manuals have been widely proclaimed by many leading authorities to be the best and most practical of their kind in the world.
Pelton has been much in demand as a speaker to diverse groups all over the United States on a great variety of survival subjects – pertaining to both urban and wilderness survival techniques. Included are such topics as buying and stocking a backpack, building shelters in the wilderness, long-term food storage for the home, edible and medicinal plants, and so on.
Mr. Pelton can be reached at:
Survival Specialists
865-776-6644
Robert W. Pelton is one of the most respected survival experts in the country. His series of four outstanding pocket survival manuals have been widely proclaimed by many leading authorities to be the best and most practical of their kind in the world.
Pelton has been much in demand as a speaker to diverse groups all over the United States on a great variety of survival subjects – pertaining to both urban and wilderness survival techniques. Included are such topics as buying and stocking a backpack, building shelters in the wilderness, long-term food storage for the home, edible and medicinal plants, and so on.
Mr. Pelton can be reached at:
Survival Specialists
865-776-6644
Robert W. Pelton is one of the most respected survival experts in the country. His series of four outstanding pocket survival manuals have been widely proclaimed by many leading authorities to be the best and most practical of their kind in the world.
Pelton has been much in demand as a speaker to diverse groups all over the United States on a great variety of survival subjects – pertaining to both urban and wilderness survival techniques. Included are such topics as buying and stocking a backpack, building shelters in the wilderness, long-term food storage for the home, edible and medicinal plants, and so on.
Mr. Pelton can be reached at:
Survival Specialists 865-776-6644
What the Experts Are Saying About The Official Pocket Surviva Manuals
“I can’t say enough good things about these books. They are the finest I have ever read. I heartily recommended them to all my students.”
-Barbara Cram – Survival Instructor
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2013

    needs pictures

    This work is informative about edible plants, but it needs pictures. It shows what parts are edible and how to best prepare them, yet unless one is already familiar with how they look, one can't identify these plants.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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