The Old Man and His Door

The Old Man and His Door

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by Gary Soto, Joe Cepeda
     
 

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Who would bring the door, la puerta, to a picnic instead of the pig, el puerco? An old man who's great at gardening but lousy at listening to his wife! "In the universal tradition of the wise-fool story, this gentle disaster tale is funny and affectionate....The combination is great for reading aloud." -- Booklist"Cepeda makes brilliant use of color, form, and

Overview

Who would bring the door, la puerta, to a picnic instead of the pig, el puerco? An old man who's great at gardening but lousy at listening to his wife! "In the universal tradition of the wise-fool story, this gentle disaster tale is funny and affectionate....The combination is great for reading aloud." -- Booklist"Cepeda makes brilliant use of color, form, and perspective to add humor to the work. It's a story children will want to retell themselves." -- Kirkus Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A Mexican ditty inspired this buoyant caper about an elderly man who grows "the hottest of hot chiles" and raises pigs "as plump as water balloons," but who is not very adept at listening to his wife. Leaving early for a barbecue with the neighbors, she instructs him to bring el puerco, the pig. But instead the preoccupied fellow removes la puerta from its hinges, and leaves home with a door on his back. It is a propitious mistake, since the well-intentioned man uses this item to perform several important services, among them entertaining a bawling baby and saving a drowning boy. And, as a result of his distractions, he accumulates a range of edibles that are eagerly consumed at his neighbors' feast. A fluid storyteller, Soto (Too Many Tamales) peppers this animated narrative with Spanish words, which are translated in a glossary that precedes the story. Working in an unusually warm palette of heated-up violets, rubies and greens, Cepeda (The Cat's Meow) relies on skillful use of color in broadly delineated compositions to flesh out el viejo's personality and augment the story's humor. Especially endearing are the images of one jovial, unquestionably plump pig who, thanks to the absent-minded hero, ends up being nobody's dinner. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreSA playful original folktale that is sure to get laughs at story time. When an old man's wife asks him to take a pig (el puerco) to roast at a party, he thinks she means the front door (la puerta). As he lugs the heavy wooden door to the festivities, he assists various animals and people and manages to collect a hat full of honey, a goose egg, a fish, and two watermelons. When he finally arrives, his wife is not angry about the confusion because the food her husband brings makes for a fine feast, even without the pig. Cepeda's bold paintings, featuring a round old man, a feisty old lady in tennis shoes, and a smiling pink pig, are perfect for group sharing. A glossary defines Spanish words and phrases scattered throughout the text. Pair this book with stories about "Amelia Bedelia" (HarperCollins) for a story time about miscommunication.Denise E. Agosto, Midland County Public Library, TX

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698116542
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
10/28/1998
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
730,721
Product dimensions:
7.97(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Lexile:
700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Dr. Short is a division director at the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) in Washington, D.C. She has worked as a teacher, trainer, researcher, and curriculum/materials developer. Her work at CAL has concentrated on the integration of language learning with content-area instruction. Through several national projects, she has conducted research and provided professional development and technical assistance to local and state education agencies across the United States. She directed the ESL Standards and Assessment Project for TESOL and co-developed the SIOP model for sheltered instruction.

Dr. Tinajero specializes in staff development and school-university partnership programs and has consulted with school districts in the U.S. to design ESL, bilingual, literacy, and bi-literacy programs. She has served on state and national advisory committees for standards development, including the English as a New Language Advisory Panel of the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards and the Texas Reading Academies. She is currently professor of Education and Interim Dean of the College of Education at the University of Texas at El Paso and was President of the National Association for Bilingual Education, 1997-2000.

Dr. Schifini assists schools across the nation and around the world in developing comprehensive language and literacy programs for English learners. He has worked as an ESL teacher, reading specialist, school administrator and university professor. Through an arrangement with California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, Dr. Schifini currently serves as program consultant to two large teacher-training efforts in the area of reading for second language speakers of English. His research interests include early literacy and language development and the integration of language and content-area instruction.

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The Old Man and His Door 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We picked up this book because it was listed as a companion book to a lesson one of my children was being taught at school. I'd never heard of it before, but after reading it together the whole family agreed it was very sweet and particularly funny! The glossary that includes a pronunciation guide (something more editors should take note of) at the beginning of the book helps a lot, but the book doesn't beat you over the head with a Spanish lesson. If you can appreciate a husband who doesn't pay attention and the phonetic difference between 'el puerco' and 'la puerta', you'll 'get' it. A great story in any language, this one's a winner!