The Open Society Paradox: Why the Twenty-First Century Calls for More Openness--Not Less [NOOK Book]

Overview

How do we ensure security and, at the same time, safeguard civil liberties? The Open Society Paradox challenges the conventional wisdom of those on both sides of the debate-leaders who want unlimited authority and advocates who would sacrifice security for individual privacy protection. It offers a provocative alternative, suggesting that while the very openness of American society has left the United States vulnerable to today's threats, only ...
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The Open Society Paradox: Why the Twenty-First Century Calls for More Openness--Not Less

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Overview

How do we ensure security and, at the same time, safeguard civil liberties? The Open Society Paradox challenges the conventional wisdom of those on both sides of the debate-leaders who want unlimited authority and advocates who would sacrifice security for individual privacy protection. It offers a provocative alternative, suggesting that while the very openness of American society has left the United States vulnerable to today's threats, only more of this quality will make the country safer and enhance its citizens' freedom and mobility.

Uniquely qualified to address these issues, Dennis Bailey argues that the solution is not to create a police state that restricts liberties but, paradoxically, to embrace greater openness. Through new technologies that engender transparency, including secure information, biometrics, surveillance, facial recognition, and data mining, society can remove the anonymity of the ill-intentioned while revitalizing the notions of trust and accountability and enhancing freedom for most Americans. He explores the impact of greater transparency on our lives, our relationships, and our liberties. The Open Society Paradox is a brave exploration of how to realign our traditional assumptions about privacy with a twenty-first-century concept of an open society.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Offers a truly original approach to our thinking about the relationship between the society and the individual in an age of rapidly expanding technological surveillance. The book opens new vistas and is thought-provoking even for those who have long inhabited the many fields of study that the book encompasses."

"Dennis Bailey’s analysis of privacy and society is comprehensive, lively, and persuasive. Whether you are a citizen concerned about freedom or a seasoned privacy advocate, buy this book. The dialogue it offers concerning liberty and technology in a post-9/11 world is important and engaging."

"A magnificent addition to the ongoing discussion about the proper balance between privacy and transparency. Bailey’s comprehensive and thoughtful review of current practices and his provocative proposals for the future are sure to stir debate. This book should be in the library of everyone concerned with civil liberties in the post-9/11 age."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781612343112
  • Publisher: Potomac Books Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/30/2004
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Dennis Bailey is an information technology consultant whose expertise includes security and privacy issues in the public and private sectors. He currently helps the State Department manage private personnel data. He is also a participant in the Sub-Group on Identification for the Markle Foundation’s Task Force on National Security in the Information Age. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2004

    Critical reading for our nation!

    On the one hand, we have privacy advocates who are fearful that we¿ll lose our civil liberties. On the other hand we have people arguing that we must do what¿s necessary to protect our security in these dangerous times. Who is right? Neither, argues author Dennis Bailey. Instead he offers a whole new approach that will de-polarize our nation, allowing us together to face the challenges threatening our very existence. Destined to be controversial, Bailey¿s thought-provoking ideas are much-needed as we consider our nation¿s future. I was fortunate to get a copy of this readable book early after its release, and urge you to read it, too! Let¿s get a national debate going, and pass these much-needed solutions on to our leaders!

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