The Ottoman Cage (Inspector Ikmen Series #2)

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Overview

"A young man's body is found in a secret apartment in Istanbul. The youth's limbs are atrophied and covered with injection marks. The windows in the flat are nailed shut and the victim has never been seen leaving or entering the flat. The only person sighted at the building over the years has been a well-dressed Armenian whose identity is unknown. Has the boy been kept prisoner? If so, by whom? And how did he die?" Inspector Cetin Ikmen of the Turkish police force and Armenian forensic pathologist Arto Sarkissian have frequently worked together.
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Overview

"A young man's body is found in a secret apartment in Istanbul. The youth's limbs are atrophied and covered with injection marks. The windows in the flat are nailed shut and the victim has never been seen leaving or entering the flat. The only person sighted at the building over the years has been a well-dressed Armenian whose identity is unknown. Has the boy been kept prisoner? If so, by whom? And how did he die?" Inspector Cetin Ikmen of the Turkish police force and Armenian forensic pathologist Arto Sarkissian have frequently worked together. They are close friends too, despite the differences in their religion, race, income, and lifestyles. But as they join forces to investigate this case, Ikmen senses an uneasiness in his friend's manner that he does not understand. Meanwhile, Ikmen has problems aplenty at home with his elderly father suffering from dementia and his nine children all clamoring for his undivided attention. And if that isn't enough, one of his team is developing a crush on another, which does not bode well for the case at all.
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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
In modern-day Turkey, layers of mystery surround the discovery of a teenaged boy's body in an unlikely place. Istanbul police are called by an elderly woman to check out a tall, imposing house next door because the front door's been left ajar for several hours. In this affluent neighborhood-the house shares a wall with the famous Topkapi Museum-that alone is cause for suspicion. Responding, pretty Sergeant Farskagolu and taciturn little Constable Cohen see scant evidence of habitation except on a top floor. There they find a beautiful young man, dead of an apparent drug overdose, the windows in the room nailed shut. Inspector Cetin Ikmen (Belshazzar's Daughter, 2003) is as precise as Hercule Poirot in approaching the case, but there are numerous blind alleys. The owner of the house reports that no tenant lived on the top floor, a pair of distraught parents with a missing son who fits the corpse's description don't identify it as their loved one, estimates on age and nationality keep changing. A significant break comes when the victim is linked to an underground network of young men for sexual hire. The drama of the investigation is rivaled by shifting relationships among Ikmen and his team. Most significantly, unhappily married Sergeant Suleyman comes clean with Farskagolu about his long-unrequited love. Fascinating depiction of Turkish culture, tidbits of history, and a decent whodunit.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781933397849
  • Publisher: Felony & Mayhem, LLC
  • Publication date: 11/25/2007
  • Series: Inspectr Ikmen Series , #2
  • Pages: 436
  • Sales rank: 1,003,443
  • Product dimensions: 5.54 (w) x 7.66 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

Barbara Nadel was born and bred in London. Trained as an actress, she is now a public relations officer for the National Schizophrenia Fellowship's Good Companions Service. She loves Turkey and has been a regular visitor there for over 20 years.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    thrilling Turkish police procedural

    In the upscale neighborhood of Ishak Pasa in Istanbul, Turkey, a neighbor sees an open door to a house that is occupied by an Armenian. She calls the police and the body of a twenty year old male covered with track marks and garroted is found. Inspector Cetin Ikmen is assigned the case and quickly notices that the young man was in a small apartment, separated from the rest of the mansion. The tenant Mr. Zekiyan is nowhere to be found.--- There is nothing in the apartment except a collection of crystal figurines. There are no fingerprints, DNA or trace elements to give a clue to who Mr. Zekiyan really is or who the victim was. The drug found in the victim¿s system is a synthetic form of heroin available only to doctors. Using informants, Inspector Ikmen discovers that a medical doctor is supplying drugs to male prostitute addicts. While the investigation concentrates on the medical profession, the killer sends the inspector crystal figures like those found in the dead man¿s home, daring him to uncover his identity.--- It is obvious that Barbara Nadel has a love affair with Turkey using the culture of the country as the basis for the murder mystery. The inspector is an interesting and complex protagonist who works himself to death so he doesn¿t have to cope with nine children, an ailing wife and a delusional father. Though a killer scorning police is old hat, the exotic locale adds an extra bit of spice to a thrilling police procedural that makes THE OTTOMAN CAGE a great treat for armchair travelers.--- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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