The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community

The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community

by John T. Bruer
     
 
The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community is a groundbreaking sociological study of the place women in a largely male-dominated world of modern-day science. It explores the subtle alienation of woman scientists--and its profound effect on their work. Though the number of women in science has virtually tripled in recent years, women scientists remain

Overview

The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community is a groundbreaking sociological study of the place women in a largely male-dominated world of modern-day science. It explores the subtle alienation of woman scientists--and its profound effect on their work. Though the number of women in science has virtually tripled in recent years, women scientists remain an unrewarded minority and their contributions still lag far behind. Although the symptoms of discrimination can be explained in any number of ways--and the authors investigate these thoroughly--it is depressingly clear that there is an institutionalized "old boy network" that underlies the foundation of modern science, and it is always difficult for a woman to break these subtle barriers. Difficulties in being published mean difficulties in obtaining monies for research, difficulties in becoming tenured, and difficulties maintaining a productive laboratory--all of which contribute to the myth that women scientists are less productive than men.

The Outer Circle is an expert sociological study of the complex dynamics that exists in the world of contemporary science and a powerful document for reform.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
The editors of this book have brought together a selection of essays that discuss, in depth, the barriers met by women scientists. They provide no easy answers and suggest several areas where considerably more research is needed. In addition to the most current research in this area, the book also includes candid interviews with three eminent women scientists: Salome Waelsch, Andrea Dupree, and Sandra Panem. The concluding chapter presents a ``theory of limited differences'' that demonstrates how small disparities (from the male norm) throughout a female scientist's career can create a virtually unassailable barrier to professional success. This is an objective, thorough treatment that deserves wide reading.-- Hilary D. Burton, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, Cal.
Booknews
Originally published in hardcover by W.W. Norton in 1991. Contains interviews with three women scientists and papers selected from symposia on women in science held at Stanford U. between 1983 and 1986. Topics include women's and men's perceptions of their contributions to science; marriage, motherhood, and research performance; and structural and cultural barriers to the recognition and demonstration of achievement. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300054392
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
01/28/1991
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 6.10(h) x (d)

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