The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America by Bruce Kraig, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

by Bruce Kraig
     
 

The second edition of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America thoroughly updates the original, award-winning title, while capturing the shifting American perspective on food and ensuring that this title is the most authoritative, current reference work on American cuisine.

In over 1,400 entries, this new edition of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and

Overview

The second edition of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America thoroughly updates the original, award-winning title, while capturing the shifting American perspective on food and ensuring that this title is the most authoritative, current reference work on American cuisine.

In over 1,400 entries, this new edition of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America reflects the many changes in American food consciousness during the twenty-first century. Once a niche market, food television has become ubiquitous, as are websites devoted to all sorts of regional cuisines. New health consciousness has spawned obesity taxes, transfat and calorie-count laws, the slow food movement, and locavorism. Ethnic foods and the fusion of these have led to new crazes for such cuisines as Southwestern sushi and Filipino hamburgers.

These timely trends and topics have been newly incorporated into the new edition of The Encyclopedia, adding one volume and over 300 new entries on these and other subjects such as food science and nutrition, molecular gastronomy, genetically-modified foods, food controversies, regional foods, the volatile nature of food prices, and food traditions of major American cities. Entries from The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink have also been added, as have a substantial number of biographies of culinary personalities. All bibliographies and non-historical entries have been revisited for updating.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Nothing will satisfy the foodie more than the two volumes of The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, which takes the reader from Anadama bread, which originated on Boston's North Shore, to an 1845 dinner at the White House," —The Boston Globe

"Fascinating, informative, these two volumes are a wealth of information on every aspect of American food and drink....Truly an invaluable resource."—Washington Post

"Essential....Anyone who can put it down is unburdened by curiosity about anything." —The New Yorker

"Whether readers make a living studying culinary traditions or just enjoy eating, they'll find this book a marvel. A trove of in-depth information on every aspect of American food and drink—such as holiday food traditions, the Slow Food movement and vegetarianism—the book strives to place its subject into historical and cultural context and succeeds brilliantly....Readers will be hooked upon opening either volume (the entire work is split in two) and flipping to any page....For food lovers of all stripes, this work inspires, enlightens and entertains."—Publishers Weekly STARRED REVIEW

"An authoritative resource that brings together 'the best scholarship on the history of American food'.... With entries ranging from "Bialy" to "Borden" (complete with a sidebar on "Elsie the Cow"), and "Vegetarianism" to "Vienna Sausage," this is an encyclopedic smorgasbord where readers can either casually graze multiple offerings or choose a single topic and dig in." — School Library Journal STARRED REVIEW

"How did the mock apple pie originate? What's the difference between a frappe and a milkshake? Who introduced the first frozen TV dinner? Answers to queries such as these can be found in this highly entertaining set...Essential. Highly recommended for all libraries." — Choice

"Essential.... Anyone who can put it down is unburdened by curiosity about anything."—The New Yorker

"This two-volume encyclopedia presents a comprehensive and delightful voyage through historical and contemporary foodways.... Will provide fodder for countless explorations and discoveries such as these for food lovers, scholars, students, and writers. With its excellent organization, lucid writing, and comprehensive coverage, it will be an invaluable resource for years to come."—Gastronomica

Library Journal
Culinary historian Smith (The Tomato in America) explains that this work is not meant to be comprehensive and that it "can only scratch the surface" of most topics. This edition offers an additional volume and more than 500 new entries, which include biographies and entries on immigrant and ethnic foodways and famous products, as well as culinary biographies of 30 cities. Still, much of the LJ review (2/15/05) of the first edition still holds true. For instance, readers still won't find an entry on the paleo diet or its advocates such as Dr. Loren Cordain. Mention of the standard western diet and metabolic syndrome are also missing. The topics chosen for inclusion, however, are appropriate if eclectic and offbeat which may be considered a strength of this work. They range from the mundane, e.g., an entry on corn, to the unexpected, such as social media and food blogging. The alphabetically arranged entries vary in length, with the longer ones divided into manageable subsections; all are written in nontechnical language and are current. Perhaps the most important features of the work are the further-reading recommendations at the end of each entry and the appendixes, which include a food and drink bibliography; information on pertinent periodicals, websites, library collections, museums, and organizations; and the very complete index. VERDICT This broad, varied collection of more than 1,300 food-related entries touches on every aspect of food. While it does not serve as a replacement to Larousse Gastronomique, it may be appropriate as a companion. Librarians should check their current holdings for overlap before purchasing. Most appropriate for public, high school, and undergraduate libraries.—Lisa Ennis, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham
Publishers Weekly
Whether readers make a living studying culinary traditions or just enjoy eating, they'll find this book a marvel. A trove of in-depth information on every aspect of American food and drink-such as holiday food traditions, the Slow Food movement and vegetarianism-the book strives to place its subject in historical and cultural context and succeeds brilliantly. Smith, who teaches culinary history at the New School University, compiles 800 articles and 400 illustrations in a colossal package, resembling Schott's Food & Drink Miscellany in the same way that the kitchen at the Four Seasons resembles the galley of a Manhattan apartment. Under "C," we find "Chickpeas," "Child, Julia," "Clambake," "Cola Wars," "Community-Supported Agriculture" and "Cooperatives"; while "T" offers entries on "Taco Bell," "Tea," "Thanksgiving," "Transportation of Food" and "Tupperware." Readers will be hooked upon opening either of the work's two volumes and flipping to any page. Among the offerings are a Nation article from 1879 that delights in fathers who'd mortify their daughters in social situations by joking about the "frivolousness of napkins"; an entry on the french dip sandwich crediting a Los Angeles sandwich shop owner with inventing the item in 1918 (he accidentally dropped a roll into the roast drippings as he prepared a beef sandwich for a customer); a piece on Rastus, the fictional chef whose image has appeared on Cream of Wheat packages since 1896; and a fascinating exploration of Southern regional cookery. For food lovers of all stripes, this work inspires, enlightens and entertains. B&w illus. (Nov.) Forecast: With the right media coverage, this could see booming bookstore, library and cooking school sales. Oxford kicked things off with a symposium and reception at the Institute of Culinary Education in October. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-An authoritative resource that brings together "the best scholarship on the history of American food." Considering the subject from varied perspectives, the 770 articles discuss food and drink within the context of politics; geography; commerce; technology; medicine; class structure; agriculture; and symbolic, spiritual, and ethical values. The alphabetically arranged entries include chronological overviews of events and trends ("Cooking Schools," "Myths and Folklore"); specific foods and drinks ("Po'boy Sandwich," "Coca-Cola"); ethnic, religious, cultural, and racial contributions ("Native American Foods," "Thanksgiving"); biographies ("Lagasse, Emeril," "Pullman, George"); and political and social movements ("Temperance," "Pure Food and Drug Act"). Each entry includes a briefly annotated bibliography and cross references to related articles. Black-and-white illustrations add interest; most of them are historical reproductions with brief identifying captions. The writing is clear, the coverage is thorough, and the index is comprehensive. With entries ranging from "Bialy" to "Borden" (complete with a sidebar on "Elsie the Cow"), and "Vegetarianism" to "Vienna Sausage," this is an encyclopedic smorgasbord where readers can either casually graze multiple offerings or choose a single topic and dig in.-Joyce Adams Burner, Hillcrest Library, Prairie Village, KS Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199734962
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
11/30/2012
Pages:
2560
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 2.10(d)

Meet the Author

Andrew F. Smith teaches culinary history and professional food writing at The New School University in Manhattan. He serves as a consultant to several food television productions (airing on the History Channel and the Food Network), and is the General Editor for the University of Illinois Press' Food Series. He has written several books on food, including The Tomato in America, Pure Ketchup, and Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn in America.

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