The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present

Overview

When newly-liberated African American slaves attempted to enter the marketplace and exercise their rights as citizens of the United States in 1865, few, if any, Americans expected that, a century and a half later, the class divide between black and white Americans would be as wide as it is today. The United States has faced several potential key turning points in the status of African Americans over the course of its history, yet at each of these points the prevailing understanding of African Americans and their ...

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Overview

When newly-liberated African American slaves attempted to enter the marketplace and exercise their rights as citizens of the United States in 1865, few, if any, Americans expected that, a century and a half later, the class divide between black and white Americans would be as wide as it is today. The United States has faced several potential key turning points in the status of African Americans over the course of its history, yet at each of these points the prevailing understanding of African Americans and their place in the economic and political fabric of the country was at best contested and resolved on the side of second-class citizenship.

The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present seeks to answer the question of what the United States would look like today if, at the end of the Civil War, freed slaves had been granted full political, social and economic rights. It does so by tracing the historical evolution of African American experiences, from the dawn of Reconstruction onward, through the perspectives of sociology, political science, law, economics, education and psychology. As a whole, the book is the first systematic study of the gap between promise and performance of African Americans since 1865. Over the course of thirty-four chapters, written by some of the most eminent scholars of African American studies and across every major social discipline, this handbook presents a full and powerful portrait of the particular hurdles faced by African Americans and the distinctive contributions African Americans have made to the development of U.S. institutions and culture. As such, it tracks where African Americans have been in order to better illuminate the path ahead.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The discussions of citizenship here help shed light on the dilemmas of modern debates within African American politics. This is excellent work that provides a broad overview of a central question of African American lives. Highly recommended." —CHOICE
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195188059
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 4/18/2012
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 864
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 2.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and the Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.

Claude Steele is Provost of the University and Professor of Psychology at Columbia University.

Lawrence D. Bobo is the W. E. B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University. He holds appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Department of African and African American Studies.

Michael Dawson is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago.

Gerald Jaynes is Professor of Economics and African-American Studies at Yale University.

Lisa Crooms-Robinson is Professor of Law and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at Howard University.

Linda Darling-Hammond is Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University and Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education.

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Table of Contents

Part One: Introduction
1. African American Citizenship, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Part Two: The African American Social Experience, 1865-Present
2. An American Conundrum: Race, Sociology, and the African American Road to Citizenship, Lawrence D. Bobo
3. Race and the Limits of American Democracy: African Americans from the Fall of Reconstruction to the Rise of the Ghetto, Frank Samson
4. The Strange Career of Racial Science, Racial Categories and African American Identity, Victor Thompson
5. Race-Conscious Color Blindness: World War II, Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, and the Strange Persistence of the One-Drop Rule, Victor Thompson
6. From Color Caste to Color Blind?: Racial Attitudes in the United States Since World War II, Maria Krysan
7. Racial Attitudes from the Civil Rights to the Black Power Eras: 1946-1975, Maria Krysan
8. Contemporary Era Racial Attitudes: 1976 - Present, Maria Krysan
Part Three: The African American Economic Experience, 1865-Present
9. From Slave to Citizen: An Overview of the Evolution of African American Economic Status, Gerald Jaynes
10. Reconstruction: The Foundations of Economic Citizenship, Gerald Jaynes
11. The Economy and the Black Citizen, 1900-World War II, Gerald Jaynes
12. The Expansion of Economic Rights since World War II, Gerald Jaynes
13. Government Policy and the Poor, Gerald Jaynes
Part Four: African American Politics, 1865-Present
14. African American Politics and Citizenship, 1865-Present: An Overview, Michael Dawson
15. The Black Public Sphere and Black Civil Society, Michael Dawson
16. Blacks and the Racialized State, Michael Dawson
17. War and African American Citizenship, 1865-1965: The Role of Military Service, Christopher Parker
18. From the Civil Rights Movement to the Present, Michael Dawson
19. African American Women: Intersectionality in Politics, Cathy J. Cohen, Jamila Celestine-Michener, and Andrew Dilts
Part Five: African Americans and the Law, 1865-Present
20. The United States Constitution and the Struggle for African American Citizenship: An Overview, Lisa Crooms-Robinson
21. African American Legal Status from Reconstruction Law to the Nadir of Jim Crow: 1865-1919, Lisa Crooms-Robinson
22. African American Legal Status from the Harlem Renaissance through World War II, Lisa Crooms-Robinson
23. Law from the Rise of the Civil Rights Movement to the Present, Lisa Crooms-Robinson
Part Six: African Americans and Education, 1865-Present
24. Education and the Quest for African American Citizenship: An Overview, Linda Darling-Hammond, Joy Ann Williamson-Lott, and Maria E. Hyler
25. Emancipation and Reconstruction: African American Education, 1865-1919, Linda Darling-Hammond, Joy Ann Williamson-Lott, and Maria E. Hyler
26. From "the New Negro" to Civil Rights: African American Education, 1919-1945, Linda Darling-Hammond, Joy Ann Williamson-Lott, and Maria E. Hyler
27. Education from Civil Rights through Black Power: 1945-1975, Linda Darling-Hammond, Joy Ann Williamson-Lott, and Maria E. Hyler
28. From Retrenchment to Renewal: African American Education, 1975-Present, Linda Darling-Hammond, Joy Ann Williamson-Lott, and Maria E. Hyler
Part Seven: The Changing Psychologies of African Americans, 1865-Present
29. The African American Psyche, 1865-Present: An Overview, Claude Steele and Jennifer Richeson
30. Predicaments, Coping and Resistance: Social and Personal Identities among African Americans, William Cross, Jr.
31. Contemporary Black Identities and Personalities, William Cross, Jr.
32. The Rise and Fall of Race Psychology in the Study of African Americans, Daryl Michael Scott
33. Black Personality in the Integrationist Era, Daryl Michael Scott
34. The Racism of Intelligence: How Mental Testing Practices Have Constituted an Institutionalized Form of Group Domination, Jean-Claude Croizet

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