The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World

Overview


The past thirty years have seen an explosion of interest in Greek and Roman social history, particularly studies of women and the family. Until recently these studies did not focus especially on children and childhood, but considered children in the larger context of family continuity and inter-family relationships, or legal issues like legitimacy, adoption and inheritance. Recent publications have examined a variety of aspects related to childhood in ancient Greece and Rome, but until now nothing has attempted ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $119.42   
  • New (5) from $131.78   
  • Used (2) from $119.42   
Sending request ...

Overview


The past thirty years have seen an explosion of interest in Greek and Roman social history, particularly studies of women and the family. Until recently these studies did not focus especially on children and childhood, but considered children in the larger context of family continuity and inter-family relationships, or legal issues like legitimacy, adoption and inheritance. Recent publications have examined a variety of aspects related to childhood in ancient Greece and Rome, but until now nothing has attempted to comprehensively survey the state of ancient childhood studies. This handbook does just that, showcasing the work of both established and rising scholars and demonstrating the variety of approaches to the study of childhood in the classical world. In thirty chapters, with a detailed introduction and envoi, The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World presents current research in a wide range of topics on ancient childhood, including sub-disciplines of Classics that rarely appear in collections on the family or childhood such as archaeology and ancient medicine. Contributors include some of the foremost experts in the field as well as younger, up-and-coming scholars. Unlike most edited volumes on childhood or the family in antiquity, this collection also gives attention to the late antique period and whether (or how) conceptions of childhood and the life of children changed with Christianity. The chronological spread runs from archaic Greece to the later Roman Empire (fifth century C.E.). Geographical areas covered include not only classical Greece and Roman Italy, but also the eastern Mediterranean. The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World engages with perennially valuable questions about family and education in the ancient world while providing a much-needed touchstone for research in the field.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199781546
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 12/11/2013
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Pages: 720
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Judith Evans Grubbs is Betty Gage Holland Professor of Roman History at Emory University.

Tim Parkin is Professor of Ancient History at University of Manchester.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contributors
Abbreviations

INTRODUCTION
Judith Evans Grubbs and Tim Parkin

PART I. GESTATION, BIRTH, DISEASE, AND DEATH
1. Becoming Human: from the Embryo to the Newborn Child
Véronique Dasen

2. The Demography of Infancy and Early Childhood in the Ancient World
Tim Parkin

3. Babies in the Well: Archaeological Evidence for Newborn Disposal in Hellenistic Greece
Maria Liston and Susan Rotroff

4. (Not) Bringing up Baby: Infant Exposure and Infanticide
Judith Evans Grubbs

5. The child patient of the Hippocratics: early Pediatrics?
Lesley Dean-Jones

6. Raising a Disabled Child
Christian Laes

PART II. CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD IN ANCIENT GREECE
7. Children in Archaic and Classical Greek art: A Survey
John Oakley

8. Children as Learners and Producers in Early Greece
Susan Langdon

9. Shifting Gender: Age and Social Status as Modifiers of Childhood Gender in Ancient Athens
Lesley Beaumont

10. Children in Athenian Religion
Robert Garland

11. Play, Pathos and Precocity: The Three "P"s of Greek Literary Childhood
Louise Pratt

PART III. CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD IN ANCIENT ROME
12. Children in Latin Epic
Mark Golden

13. The Socialization of Roman Children
Janette McWilliam

14. Slave and Lower-class Roman Children
Hanne Sigismund Nielsen

15. Children and Childhood in Roman Commemorative Art
Lena Larsson Lovén

16. Toys, Dolls and the Material Culture of Childhood
Mary Harlow

17. Roman Children and the Law
Thomas A.J. McGinn

PART IV. EDUCATION AND EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY IN THE CLASSICAL WORLD
18. Education in Plato's Laws
Cynthia Patterson

19. Boys, Girls, Family, and the State at Sparta
Nigel Kennell

20. Engendering the Scroll: Girls' and Women's Literacy in Classical Greece
Matthew Dillon

21. Educating the Youth: the Athenian ephebeia in the Early Hellenistic Era
Eric Casey

22. The Ancient Child in School
Martin Bloomer

PART V. CHILDREN IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN
23. Children in Hellenistic Egypt: What the Papyri Say
Maryline Parca

24. Children in Roman Egypt
April Pudsey

25. Adoption and Fosterage in the Ancient Eastern Mediterranean
Sabine Huebner

26. Pictorial paideia: Children in the Synagogue
Hagith Sivan

PART VI. LATE ANTIQUITY AND EARLY CHRISTIANITY
27. Children and "the Child" in early Christianity
Blake Leyerle

28. Elite Children, Socialization and Agency in the Late Roman world
Ville Vuolanto

29. Remembering Children in the Roman Catacombs
Jenny Kreiger

30. Stages of Infancy in Roman Amphora Burial
Susan Stevens

EVNOI
Keith Bradley

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)