The Oxford Handbook of Interactive Audio

Overview


As audiences are increasingly no longer solely listeners but also active producer-consumers, and as video games and other interactive systems increasingly permeate our daily lives, understanding interactivity and its impact on the audience has never been more important. A collection of newly commissioned chapters on interactivity in music and sound edited by preeminent scholars in the field, this book marks the beginning of a journey into understanding the ways in which we interact with sound, and offers a new ...
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Overview


As audiences are increasingly no longer solely listeners but also active producer-consumers, and as video games and other interactive systems increasingly permeate our daily lives, understanding interactivity and its impact on the audience has never been more important. A collection of newly commissioned chapters on interactivity in music and sound edited by preeminent scholars in the field, this book marks the beginning of a journey into understanding the ways in which we interact with sound, and offers a new set of analytical tools for the growing field of interactive audio.

What does it mean to interact with sound? How does interactivity alter our experience as creators and listeners? What makes interactive audio different from non-interactive audio? Where does interacting with audio fit into our understanding of sound and music? What does the future hold for interactive media when it comes to our musical and sonic experiences? And how do we begin to approach interactive audio from a theoretical perspective? The Oxford Handbook of Interactive Audio answers these questions by exploring the full range of interactive audio in video games, performance, education, environmental design, toys, and artistic practice. Examining these questions from a range of approaches -- technological, emotional, psychological, and physical -- the book provides a thorough overview of the fascinating experience of interactive sound.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199797226
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 5/2/2014
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 1,118,644
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Collins is Canada Research Chair in Interactive Audio at the Games Insitute, University of Waterloo. She is the author of Game Sound (2008) and Playing With Sound (2013), and the editor of From Pac-Man to Pop Music (2008).

Bill Kapralos is an Associate Professor in the Game Development and Entrepreneurship Program at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. His research interests include real-time acoustical modeling and 3D (spatial) sound generation for virtual environments, multi-modal interactions, serious games, and the perception of auditory events.

Holly Tessler is a Senior Lecturer in Commercial Music in the School of Creative and Cultural Industries at the University of West Scotland. Areas of research interest include the Beatles as industry, music and cultural branding, music industries as cultural industries, interactive audio and music and popular culture.

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Table of Contents

Introduction (Karen Collins, Holly Tessler and Bill Kapralos)
List of Acronyms Commonly Found in the Handbook
List of Software Found in the Handbook
List of Games Found in the Handbook
List of Contributors

Section 1: Interactive Sound in Practice
Chapter 1 Spatial Reconfiguration in Interactive Video Art (Holly Rogers)
Chapter 2 Navigating Sound: Locative and Translocational Approaches to Interactive Audio (Nye Parry)
Chapter 3 Defining Sound Toys: Play as Composition (Andrew Dolphin)
Chapter 4 Thinking More Dynamically about Using Sound to Enhance Learning from Instructional Technologies (M.J. Bishop)
Chapter 5 Acoustic Scenography and Interactive Audio: Sound Design for Built Environments (Jan Paul Herzer )

Section 2: Videogames and Virtual Worlds
Chapter 6 The Unanswered Question of Musical Meaning: A Cross-Domain Approach (Tom Langhorst)
Chapter 7 How can Interactive Music be Used in Virtual Worlds like World of Warcraft? (Jon Inge Lomeland)
Chapter 8 Sound and the Videoludic Experience (Guillaume Roux-Girard)
Chapter 9 Designing a Game for Music: Integrated Design Approaches for Ludic Music and Interactivity. (Richard Stevens and Dave Raybould)
Chapter 10 Worlds of music: Strategies for creating music-based experiences in videogames (Melanie Fritsch)

Section 3: The Psychology and Emotional Impact of Interactive Audio
Chapter 11 Embodied Virtual Acoustic Ecologies of Computer Games (Mark Grimshaw and Tom Garner)
Chapter 12 A Cognitive Approach to the Emotional Function of Game Sound (Inger Ekman)
Chapter 13 The Sound of Being There: Presence and Interactive Audio in Immersive Virtual Reality (Rolf Nordahl and Niels C. Nilsson)
Chapter 14 Sonic interactions in multimodal environments: An overview (Stefania Serafin)
Chapter 15 Musical Interaction for Health Improvement (Anders-Petter Andersson and Birgitta Cappelen)
Chapter 16 Engagement, Immersion and Presence: The role of audio interactivity in location-aware sound design (Natasa Paterson and Fionnuala Conway)

Section 4: Performance and Interactive Instruments
Chapter 17 Multisensory Musicality in Dance Central (Kiri Miller)
Chapter 18 Interactivity and Liveness in Electroacoustic Concert Music (Mike Frengel)
Chapter 19 Skill in Interactive Digital Music Systems (Michael Gurevich)
Chapter 20 Gesture in the Design of Interactive Sound Models (Marc Ainger and Benjamin Schroeder)
Chapter 21 Virtual Musicians and Machine Learning (Nick Collins)
Chapter 22 Musical Behavior and Amergence in Technoetic and Media Arts (Norbert Herber)

Section 5 Tools and Techniques
Chapter 23 Flow of Creative Interaction with Digital Music Notations (Chris Nash and Alan F. Blackwell)
Chapter 24 Blurring Boundaries, Trends and Implications in Audio Production Software Developments. (David Bessell)
Chapter 25 Delivering Interactive Experiences Through the Emotional Adaptation of Automatically Composed Music (Maia Hoeberechts, Jeff Shantz, and Michael Katchabaw)
Chapter 26 A Review of Interactive Sound in Computer Games: Can Sound Affect the Motoric Behavior of a Player? (Niels Böttcher and Stefania Serafin)
Chapter 27 Interactive Spectral Processing of Musical Audio (Victor Lazzarini)

Section 6 The Practitioner's Point of View
Chapter 28 Let's Mix it up: Interviews Exploring the Practical and Technical Challenges of Interactive Mixing in Games (Helen Mitchell)
Chapter 29 Our Interactive Audio Future (Damian Kastbauer)
Chapter 30 For the Love of Chiptune (Leonard J. Paul)
Chapter 31 Procedural Audio Theory and Practice (Andy Farnell)
Chapter 32 Live Electronic Preparation: Interactive Timbral Practice (Rafal Zapala)
Chapter 33 New Tools for Interactive Audio, and What Good they Do. (Tim van Geelen)

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