The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies, Volume 2

The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies, Volume 2

by Sumanth Gopinath
     
 

The two volumes of The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies consolidate an area of scholarly inquiry that addresses how mechanical, electrical, and digital technologies and their corresponding economies of scale have rendered music and sound increasingly mobile-portable, fungible, and ubiquitous. At once a marketing term, a common mode of everyday-life

Overview

The two volumes of The Oxford Handbook of Mobile Music Studies consolidate an area of scholarly inquiry that addresses how mechanical, electrical, and digital technologies and their corresponding economies of scale have rendered music and sound increasingly mobile-portable, fungible, and ubiquitous. At once a marketing term, a common mode of everyday-life performance, and an instigator of experimental aesthetics, "mobile music" opens up a space for studying the momentous transformations in the production, distribution, consumption, and experience of music and sound that took place between the late nineteenth and the early twenty-first centuries. Taken together, the two volumes cover a large swath of the world-the US, the UK, Japan, Brazil, Germany, Turkey, Mexico, France, China, Jamaica, Iraq, the Philippines, India, Sweden-and a similarly broad array of the musical and nonmusical sounds suffusing the soundscapes of mobility.

Volume 2 investigates the ramifications of mobile music technologies on musical/sonic performance and aesthetics. Two core arguments are that "mobility" is not the same thing as actual "movement" and that artistic production cannot be absolutely sundered from the performances of quotidian life. The volume's chapters investigate the mobilization of frequency range by sirens and miniature speakers; sound vehicles such as boom cars, ice cream trucks, and trains; the gestural choreographies of soundwalk pieces and mundane interactions with digital media; dance music practices in laptop and iPod DJing; the imagery of iPod commercials; production practices in Turkish political music and black popular music; the aesthetics of handheld video games and chiptune music; and the mobile device as a new musical instrument and resource for musical ensembles.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[A] very welcome and totally immersive experience." —International Record Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199913657
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
04/22/2014
Series:
Oxford Handbooks Series
Pages:
544
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 9.80(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

Sumanth Gopinath is the author of The Ringtone Dialectic: Economy and Cultural Form (2013). His writings on Steve Reich, musical minimalism, Marxism, academic politics, ringtones, Bob Dylan, and Benjamin Britten have appeared in scholarly journals including Music Theory Spectrum, Journal of the Society for American Music, and First Monday, and in the edited collections Sound Commitments, Highway 61 Revisited, and Music and Narrative since 1900.

Jason Stanyek is University Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at the University of Oxford, where he is also Fellow and Tutor in Music at St John's College. His writings on Brazilian music, improvisation, music technology, and jazz have appeared in a range of academic journals and edited collections. Forthcoming books include a monograph on music and dance in the Brazilian diaspora and a volume (co-edited with Frederick Moehn) titled Brazil's Northern Wave: Fifty Years of Bossa Nova in the United States.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >