The Panama Canal: The Story of how a jungle was conquered and the world made smaller

The Panama Canal: The Story of how a jungle was conquered and the world made smaller

by Elizabeth Mann, Fernando Rangel
     
 

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Panama was less than 50 miles wide, yet difficult to bridge by canal — its swamps were disease-ridden, its mountainous rain forest challenged the most brilliant engineers, and its oppressive heat exhausted the hardiest workers. Engineers found ways to cut through the forest, medical visionaries conquered the diseases, and workers endured the jungle. Yet there

Overview

Panama was less than 50 miles wide, yet difficult to bridge by canal — its swamps were disease-ridden, its mountainous rain forest challenged the most brilliant engineers, and its oppressive heat exhausted the hardiest workers. Engineers found ways to cut through the forest, medical visionaries conquered the diseases, and workers endured the jungle. Yet there were also broken treaties, political tyranny, and the tragedy of thousands of West Indian workers forced to live in awful, segregated conditions.

Wonders of the World series

The winner of numerous awards, this series is renowned for Elizabeth Mann's ability to convey adventure and excitement while revealing technical information in engaging and easily understood language. The illustrations are lavishly realistic and accurate in detail but do not ignore the human element. Outstanding in the genre, these books are sure to bring even the most indifferent young reader into the worlds of history, geography, and architecture.

"One of the ten best non-fiction series for young readers."
- Booklist

Editorial Reviews

Waterbury Republican-American
This engaging narrative is full of history, public health issues, jungles, heroes, genius and danger.
— Betsy Daley
Waterbury Republican-American - Betsy Daley
This engaging narrative is full of history, public health issues, jungles, heroes, genius and danger.
Canadian Materials - Gail Hamilton
Informative, entertaining, often riveting, these books offer readers important pieces of history and bring the civilizations to life... A must-have series! Highly recommended.
Children's Literature - Dianne Ochiltree
This hardback picture book captures the spirit of an age that believed no task was impossible, and no price too high to pay for progress. It was the turn of the century, and no country exemplified this brash optimism more than the United States under the leadership of President Theodore Roosevelt. So it was, that in 1901, American engineers embarked on a mission to connect the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans by constructing a canal through the narrow Isthmus of Panama. The strip of land, less than 50 miles wide, proved less a challenge than did disease, thick rainforest vegetation, oppressive heat and mountainous terrain. The book documents the eventual victory over these obstacles, and the human cost to achieve it. This is a visually stunning book, with foldout spreads, vintage photos and full color illustrations that accurately portray this tropical region.
Kirkus Reviews
Mann (The Great Wall, 1997, etc.) offers the older end of the picture-book set a concrete, engaging narrative on another of the man-made wonders of the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781931414142
Publisher:
Mikaya Press
Publication date:
02/04/2006
Series:
Wonders of the World Book Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,170,256
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Mann has written nine Wonders of the World books, an award-winning series. She is former teacher in New York, holds an M.S.E. and is cofounder of Mikaya Press.

Fernando Rangel was born in Bogata, Colombia, and grew up in Queens, N.Y. He earned a B.F.A. at the School of Visual Arts and trained at the Chatauqua School of Art.

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