The Penguin Book of 20th-Century Speeches

The Penguin Book of 20th-Century Speeches

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by Brian MacArthur
     
 

Whether it was Churchill rousing the British to war, Fidel Castro inspiring the Cuban revolution, Bill Clinton defending himself against Monica Lewinsky or Tony Blair leading New Labour out of the wilderness, great speakers have always had the power to stir hearts, uphold great ideals and lead nations to new frontiers.

The dreams of Emmeline Pankhurst, John F.

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Overview

Whether it was Churchill rousing the British to war, Fidel Castro inspiring the Cuban revolution, Bill Clinton defending himself against Monica Lewinsky or Tony Blair leading New Labour out of the wilderness, great speakers have always had the power to stir hearts, uphold great ideals and lead nations to new frontiers.

The dreams of Emmeline Pankhurst, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela inspired millions. This anthology, newly revised to include speeches from the end of this century, including Earl Spencer's stirring philippic over the coffin of his sister, Princess Diana, contains the most famous or notorious speeches in English since 1899, as well as speeches in translation from world leaders, including Lenin, Hitler and Stalin. There are also lesser-known masterpieces from such speakers as Roger Casement, J. B. Priestley and Salman Rushdie. Many helped to change the history of the twentieth century.

Editorial Reviews

Gilbert Taylor
Few spectacles can be more riveting--in inspiring, bloodcurdling, or admonishing ways--than a spellbinding connection between orator and auditor. The nature of that link has challenged rhetoricians forever, but it always depends on a blend of intellectual and visceral appeals, with a distinctive individual style thrown in. Hitler violated most elements of speech making (his harangues rambled, rarely had a peroration, and held but two ideational hooks, the 1918 "stab in the back" and the Jewish "bacillus"), yet from sheer intensity of delivery he must be counted as the most influential, albeit sinister, speaker of the century. A conventionally organized speech, King's "I Have a Dream" script reveals the electric mental and emotive mix in better light, but the above and MacArthur's 150 other examples show the trait at work. He picked them from the political and social-justice realms, and most of his declaimers come from the British Isles or Empire. In that context, this minianthology traces imperial fortunes according to Chamberlain (the non-Neville one) through Macmillan's "wind of change" speech; it echoes with war (Lloyd George to Churchill to Thatcher); it resounds with the clashes of Labour and Tory parties (Kinnock and Thatcher again); and it pauses with warnings on total war from a divine (Bishop Bell) and a philosopher (Bertrand Russell). Those that acquired William Safire's collection ("Lend Me Your Ears: Great Speeches in History" ) can double their wealth with this well-edited tome.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670831265
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
08/28/1993
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
20.00(w) x 20.00(h) x 20.00(d)

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