The Persistence of the Sacred in Modern Thought

Overview

In The Persistence of the Sacred in Modern Thought, Chris L. Firestone, Nathan A. Jacobs, and thirteen other contributors examine the role of God in the thought of major European philosophers from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. The philosophers considered are, by and large, not orthodox theists; they are highly influential freethinkers, emancipated by an age no longer tethered to the authority of church and state. While acknowledging this fact, the contributors are united in arguing that this is only ...

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Overview

In The Persistence of the Sacred in Modern Thought, Chris L. Firestone, Nathan A. Jacobs, and thirteen other contributors examine the role of God in the thought of major European philosophers from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. The philosophers considered are, by and large, not orthodox theists; they are highly influential freethinkers, emancipated by an age no longer tethered to the authority of church and state. While acknowledging this fact, the contributors are united in arguing that this is only one side of a complex story. To redress the imbalance of attention to secularism among crucial modern thinkers and to consolidate a more theologically informed view of modernity, they focus on the centrality of the sacred (theology and God) in the thought of these philosophers. The essays, each in its own way, argue that the major figures in modernity are theologically astute, bent not on removing God from philosophy but on putting faith and reason on a more sure footing in light of advancements in science and a perceived need to rethink the relationship between God and world.
 
By highlighting and defending the theologically affirmative dimensions of thinkers such as Thomas Hobbes, Gottfried Leibniz, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, F. W. J. Schelling, G. W. F. Hegel, and others, the essayists present a forceful and timely correction of widely accepted interpretations of these philosophers. To ignore or downplay the theological dimensions of the philosophical works they address, they argue, distorts our understanding of modern thought.
 
"Over the past twenty-five years there has been a gradual change in the study of modern philosophy toward recognizing the centrality of our relation to God in the work of most of the major modern thinkers of the period. The Persistence of the Sacred in Modern Thought is a timely and useful collection that has the potential to crystallize this important development in the study of modern philosophy." —John E. Hare, Yale Divinity School

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780268029067
  • Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press
  • Publication date: 6/15/2012
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Chris L. Firestone is associate professor of philosophy at Trinity International University, Deerfield, Illinois.

Nathan A. Jacobs is assistant professor of biblical and religious studies at Trinity International University, Deerfield, Illinois.
 
Contributors: Nicholas Adams, Hubert Bost, Philip Clayton, John Cottingham, Yolanda Estes, Chris L. Firestone, Lee Hardy, Peter C. Hodgson, Nathan A. Jacobs, Jacqueline Mariña, A. P. Martinich, Richard A. Muller, Myron B. Penner, Stephen D. Snobelen, Nicholas Wolterstorff. 

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Table of Contents

Introduction Chris L. Firestone Nathan A. Jacobs 1

Chapter 1 The Desecularization of Descartes John Cottingham 15

Chapter 2 Law and Self-Preservation in Leviathan: On Misunderstanding Hobbes's Philosophy, 1650-1700 A. P. Martinich 38

Chapter 3 The Religious Spinoza Philip Clayton 66

Chapter 4 God and Design in the Thought of Robert Boyle Richard A. Muller 87

Chapter 5 God in Locke's Philosophy Nicholas Wolterstorff 112

Chapter 6 The Myth of the Clockwork Universe: Newton, Newtonianism, and the Enlightenment Stephen D. Snobelen 149

Chapter 7 Pierre Bayle: A "Complicated Protestant" Hubert Bost 185

Chapter 8 Leibniz and the Augustinian Tradition Nathan A. Jacobs 209

Chapter 9 Hume's Defense of True Religion Lee Hardy 251

Chapter 10 The Illegitimate Son: Kant and Theological Nonrealism Chris L. Firestone 273

Chapter 11 The Reception and Legacy of J. G. Fichte's Religionslehre Yolanda Estes 300

Chapter 12 Metaphysical Realism and Epistemological Modesty in Schleiermacher's Method Jacqueline Mariñ 319

Chapter 13 Schelling's Turn to Scripture Nicholas Adams 335

Chapter 14 Hegel and Secularization Peter C. Hodgson 352

Chapter 15 Kierkegaard's Critique of Secular Reason Myron B. Penner 372

List of Contributors 392

Index 397

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