The Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism: Essays on History, Culture, and Dialectical Thought [NOOK Book]

Overview

Alfred Sohn-Rethel located the origin of philosophical abstraction in the "false conciousness" brought about by the new money economy of Greek Antiquity. In the Enlightenment the conceptual barrier Kant put between phenomenal reality and the "thing-in-itself" expressed, in Sohn-Rethel’s view, the reified consciousness stemming from commodity-exchange and the division of mental and manual labor. Because Sohn-Rethel saw the entire history of philosophy as branded by a timeless universal logic, he dismissed Hegel’s ...
See more details below
The Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism: Essays on History, Culture, and Dialectical Thought

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$47.99
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$79.99 List Price

Overview

Alfred Sohn-Rethel located the origin of philosophical abstraction in the "false conciousness" brought about by the new money economy of Greek Antiquity. In the Enlightenment the conceptual barrier Kant put between phenomenal reality and the "thing-in-itself" expressed, in Sohn-Rethel’s view, the reified consciousness stemming from commodity-exchange and the division of mental and manual labor. Because Sohn-Rethel saw the entire history of philosophy as branded by a timeless universal logic, he dismissed Hegel’s concept of "totality" as "idealist" and Hegel’s critique of Kantian dualism as irrelevant to Marx’s critique of political economy.

David Black, in the title essay of The Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism, suggests, contra Sohn-Rethel, that Marx’s exposition of the fetishism of commodities is historically-specific to capitalist production, and therefore cannot explain the origins of philosophy, which Black shows to have involved various historical developments in Greek society and culture as well as monetization. Just as Hegel’s critique of Kantian formalism informs Marx’s critique of capital, Hegel’s writings on how the proper organization of labor might abolish the barrier Aristotle put between production and the "Realm of Freedom" prefigure Marx's efforts to formulate of an alternative to capitalism.

Part Two, Critique of the Situationist Dialectic: Art, Class Consciousness and Reification, begins with Surrealism, whose "disappearance" as a revolutionary artistic and social force Guy Debord and the Situationists sought to make up for by superseding the poetry of Art with the poetry of Life. As well highlighting Debord’s achievements in both theory and practice, Black points to his philosophical shortcomings and relates these to Debord’s later "pessimistic" assessment of the possibility of revolutionary class consciousness within globalizing capitalism. The four essays in Part Three cover the Aristotelian anarchism, the ambivalent legacy of Lukács' theory of reification, Raya Dunayevskaya’s Hegelian-Marxist concept of "absolute negativity" as "revolution in permanance", and Gillian Rose’s philosophical challenge to both postmodernism and "traditional" Marxism.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Peter McLaren
The well-respected historian of philosophy, David Black, has shown himself to be a consummate philosopher, so much so that he has produced a work that will stand the test of time as a major contribution to the Marxist tradition of philosophical works. His new work is a major achievement, and one that speaks directly to the historical times that we unhappily inhabit. This work is more than a feast for academics, it is necessary fuel for revolution, a revolution that is in the making and that will benefit greatly from this work. Should the coming socialist revolution begin to turn into its opposite, this is the work that we will need to read—again and again—to get back on track.
Marx & Philosophy Review of Books
Black has . . . outlined a convincing criticism of the dogmatic view that the philosophical logic of Hegel represents the logic of capital. . . .The majority of the book offers important arguments providing reasons for recognising the importance of philosophy for studying the character of contemporary capitalism. Black also relates these themes to the historically important work of Marx, Hegel and Lukács. This book can be recommended in the study of the role of philosophy for promotion of perceptive study of capitalism.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739173961
  • Publisher: Lexington Books
  • Publication date: 12/11/2013
  • Series: Studies in Marxism and Humanism
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 160
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

David Black is an independent scholar and journalist. His previous books are 1839: The Chartist Insurrection with co-author Chris Ford, Helen Macfarlane: A Feminist, Revolutionary Journalist and Philosopher in Mid-19th Century England, and Acid: A New Secret History of LSD.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part One
The Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism
1 – The 'Secret Identity' of the Commodity Form
2 – The Capitalism of Philosophy? The Greek Origins of Abstraction
3 – Rethinking the 'Origins of Abstraction'
4 – Comedy and Tragedy
5 – The Poiesis of Orpheus –Fragmentation and Wholeness
6 – Hegel's Minerva
7 – Community and Civil Society
8 – Kant and the 'Autonomous Intellect'
9 – Capitalism: De-Socialized Labor
10 – Absolute Negativity as Anti-Capitalism

Part Two
Critique of the Situationist Dialect: Art, Class-Consciousnesness, and Reification
1 – Art
Surrealism and the Crisis of the Object
In the Beginning was the Letter
Unitary Urbanism, Dérive and Détournement
Asger Jorn, the Artists and the Founding of the Situationist International
2 – Class Consciousness
Socialisme ou Barbarie
The Critique of Everyday Life and the Hegelian Dialectic
3 – Reification
The Theory of the Spectacle-Commodity and the Influence of Georg Lukács
Situationist Council Communism
The Integrated Spectacle and Globalization

Part Three
Essays
Labor and Value: from the Greek Polis to Globalized State-Capitalism
Reification in the 21st Century – Lukács' Dialectic
Ends of History and New Beginnings: Hegel and the 'Dialectics of Philosophy and Organization'
Conclusion – Philosophy and Revolution in the Twenty-First Century
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)