The Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation: A Book for the Times

The Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation: A Book for the Times

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by James Barr Walker
     
 

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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back… See more details below

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940029463388
Publisher:
John P. Jewett
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book

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CHAPTER II CONCERNING 1HE DESIGN AND NECESSITY OF ' BONDAGE IN EGYPT. There are certain bonds of union, and so of sympathy, by which the minds of a whole ] may be united into one common mind: so : so, that all hearts in the nation will be affect the same subjects, and all minds moved by| same motives. Any cause which creates a con interest and a common feeling, common and common hopes, in the individual minds wh compose a nation, has a tendency to unite the this manner. Some of the causes which have more power I any others to bind men, as it were, into a con being, are the following:—The natural tie of ( sanguinity, or a common parentage, is a sti bond of affiliation among men. And there others, which, in some cases, seem to be ev stronger than this : among these may be namedl common interest; a common religion; and a con mon feUowship in suffering and deliverance, circumstance which educes the susceptibilities the mind and twines them together, or around I common object—any event in which the intere the feelings, the safety, or the reputation of a people is involved, causes them to be more closely I allied to each other in social and civil compact. The more firmly a people are bound together by these ties of union, the more strength they will possess to resist opposing interests and opinions from without; while, at the same time, everything national, or peculiar to them as a people, will be cherished with wanner and more tenacious attachment. From the operation of this principle originates the maxim " Union is strength;" and whether the conflict be mental or physical, the people who aie united together by the most numerous and powerful sympathies, willoppose the strongest and the longest resistance to the innovations of external forces. On the contrary, ...

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