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The Piano in Chamber Ensemble: An Annotated Guide
     

The Piano in Chamber Ensemble: An Annotated Guide

by Maurice Hinson, Wesley Roberts
 

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The Piano in Chamber Ensemble describes more than 3,200 compositions, from duos to octets, by more than 1,600 composers. It is divided into sections according to the number of instruments involved, then subdivided according to the actual scoring. Keyboard, string, woodwind, brass, and percussion players and their teachers will find a wealth of chamber works from

Overview

The Piano in Chamber Ensemble describes more than 3,200 compositions, from duos to octets, by more than 1,600 composers. It is divided into sections according to the number of instruments involved, then subdivided according to the actual scoring. Keyboard, string, woodwind, brass, and percussion players and their teachers will find a wealth of chamber works from all periods.

Editorial Reviews

Choice

"... An excellent resource for all serious music collections.... Highly recommended." —Choice

American Reference Books Annual 2007

"This book is essential for all music libraries and those who perform in chamber ensembles with pianists." —American Reference Books Annual 2007

Contemporary Keyboard

"If chamber music is ‘the music of friends,’ then Maurice Hinson may be remembered... as one of chamber music’s greatest friends of all." —Contemporary Keyboard

MLA Notes

"The scope and excellence of this handbook designate it the major compendium of information about chamber music that involves the piano as an equal partner." —MLA Notes

American Reference Books Annual
"This book is essential for all music libraries and those who perform in chamber ensembles with pianists." —American Reference Books Annual
From the Publisher
"The scope and excellence of this handbook designate it the major compendium of information about chamber music that involves the piano as an equal partner." —MLA Notes

"This book is essential for all music libraries and those who perform in chamber ensembles with pianists." —American Reference Books Annual 2007

"If chamber music is ‘the music of friends,’ then Maurice Hinson may be remembered... as one of chamber music’s greatest friends of all." —Contemporary Keyboard

"... An excellent resource for all serious music collections.... Highly recommended." —Choice

Booknews
Historian Patricia Riley Dunlap recounts stories of women of the frontier West including wives and mothers, Native women, military wives, shop-owners, suffragettes, outlaws, school teachers, and many others. Paper edition (unseen), $18.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253346964
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
04/28/2006
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
720
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.64(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Piano in Chamber Ensemble

An Annotated Guide


By Maurice Hinson, Wesley Roberts

Indiana University Press

Copyright © 2006 Maurice Hinson and Wesley Roberts
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-253-34696-4



CHAPTER 1

Duos for Piano and Violin


Michel van der Aa.Double 1997 (Donemus 2000) 9pp., parts. 7 min. Requires preparing the piano by looping hairs from the bow of a stringed instrument through the piano strings of 6 notes with a rod above the instrument to bend their pitches. Pianist uses a plectrum and mallets, the latter with a thin wooden plate to prevent damage to piano. Score includes photographs to aid preparation. Avant-garde techniques of indeterminacy used to a mild extent with both instruments interacting in a complementary manner. A quartet version of this work exists as Quadrivial. An effective work which deserves to become a staple of late-20th-century avant-garde repertoire. M-D.

Evaristo Felice Dall'Abaco.Six Sonatas Op.1 (Kolneder — Schott 1956). Gamba or cello ad lib. Op.1/2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11.

_____. Six Sonatas Op.4 (Br&H). Cello ad lib.

_____. Sonatas Op.i and Op.4 are contained in DTB, Vol.I.

_____. Two Sonatas (USSR).

_____. Sonata a (Salmon — Ric R748).

_____. Sonata F (Salmon — Ric R354).

See VKDR, I: pp.84-86.

Carl Friedrich Abel.Sonatas (Bacher, Woehl — Br). Vol.I: Sonatas e, D, G. Vol.II: Sonatas C, A, A. For viola da gamba (violin or flute) and basso continuo.

_____. Sonata G (Broe — CFP B.330).

_____. Two Sonatinas (Raphael — Hin) Op.5/4 C and 5/5 A. Cello ad lib.

_____. Sonata Op.13/A (F. Piersig — Br&H 4165 1928) 11pp., parts. Editorial additions identified. Un poco moderato; Andante; Un poco vivace. Keyboard has a prominent part. Active melodic line in piano. M-D.

_____. Sonata G (F. Brüggen — Br&VP i960). For violin or flute.

_____. Sonata B[??] (F. Piersig — Br&H 4104 1928) 9pp., parts. Editorial additions identified. Allegro moderato: large movement; piano part more important than violin; broken-chord figuration; trills; triplets; p closing. Tempo di Menuetto: tastefully edited. M-D.

Walter Abendroth.Sonata Op.26 (Simrock 1961) 20pp., parts. Moderato opening with piano providing punctuated rhythmic chords. Leads to Andante section, more free and rhapsodic. Attacca moves to Energico (Allegretto) with more rhythmic propulsion, triplets, and syncopated usage. Centers around g or G with chromatically altered harmony. M-D.

Jean Absil.Sonata Op.146 1970 (CeBeDeM) 28pp., parts. 18 min. Allegro Moderato; Andantino; Vivo leggiero; Lento mysterioso; Allegretto. Displays a novel language with subtle rhythms of Romanian folklore and varied artistry throughout. D.

Joseph Achron.Suite II Op.22 1906 (UE 7692 1925) 28pp., parts. En Passant; Menuet & Trio; Moulin; Intermezzo; Marionettes. Piano part very important. Colorful, post-Romantic writing. M-D.

_____. Sonata Op.29 d 1910 (Belaieff 1914) 51pp., parts. Bewegt und ausgeregt; Hirtenliebe (Traümend); Interludium; Keck und sehr freudig. Highly chromatic, thick textures, first-rate pianism required. D.

_____. Deuxième Sonate Op.45 A 1918 (UE 7561 1924) 72pp., parts. Giocondo; Misterioso e fantastico; Burla; Focoso. In Regerian harmonic style, virtuoso writing for both instruments. D.

John Adams.Road Movies 1995 (Hendon Music 1998) 37pp., parts. 17 min. Three movements: [untitled]; Contemplative; "40% Swing." Outer movements suggest perpetual mobiles in their motoric pace, punctuated with occasional syncopated interruptions. Middle movement introduces motivic idea in piano, a 7-note ascending sequence. Minimalist tendencies throughout. D.

Samuel Adler.Sonata II 1956 (OUP 1968) 23pp., parts. 14% min. For piano or harpsichord. Allegro moderato; Lento espressivo; Allegro molto, ma non troppo. Neoclassic style. Numerous dynamic effects would not be possible on a harpsichord. M-D.

_____. Sonata III 1965 (Bo&H 1974) 28pp., parts. In 6 episodes to be performed

without interruption. Fast and intense: serial, atonal, dissonant. Very slowly: sustained, chordal, with sudden interruptions of fast short sections. Very lively: linear, staccato left-hand chords, octotonic, rhythmic melodies. Very slowly: requires large span, expressive. Like a waltz, gracefully: flowing lines, contains a few ff figuration surprises. Fast and intense: similar to opening episode, sparse textures. D.

_____. Sonata IV 1989 (LMP 1999) 37pp., parts. Quite fast; Quiet and dreamlike; Fast and very rhythmic. Three dramatic movements, sometimes requiring 4 staves for piano. Intricate rhythmic patterns. Second movement is most successful in its spacious and contemplative sonority. Requires seasoned performers. D.

_____. Double Portrait (ST 785 1989) 19pp., parts. Composed to honor the memory of 2 great artists and friends. In 2 attached sections: Slowly and serenely; Fast rhythmic, without letup. Wide span required as well as experienced performers. D.

Peter Stewart Adriaansz.Lines, Dots, and Crosses 1993 (Donemus 1993) 25pp., parts. 21 min. In 3 distinct sections as titled, meant to be played as one continuous movement. Includes notes to performers. Piano part extends to 4 staves. M-D.

Hans Ahlgrimm.Sonata g (Lienau 1938) 20pp., parts. 14 min. For violin or alto flute. Includes a separate part for alto flute. Moderato; Allegro non troppo. Chromatic, opening 3 bars in first movement contain thematic material for movement. Much alternating writing between hands in last movement. D.

Stephen Albert.Tribute 1988 (GS 3929 1988) 14pp., parts. 9 min. "Tribute revolves on a dual axis comprised of two lyrical themes that generate the other musical ideas appearing throughout this one movement work. The first theme is given to the piano in the opening and the second theme is announced by the violin on the heels of the opening piano section. Both themes are developed and elaborated on, woven in and around one another, until they are, at length, transformed into new themes that are more dramatic and rhythmic than their lyrical forebears. The end of the work is announced when a hymn-like section commences in the piano after a genuinely loud climactic section" (Composer's Note). D.

Tomaso Albinoni.Six Sonatas Op.4 (W. Kolneder — Eulenburg 1973–74). Cello part optional. Melodies have a fine sweep about them. Good realization of the figured bass.

_____. Trattenimenti Armonici per camera 12 Sonatas Op.6 (M. Talbot — EMA 106 1981), parts. Vol.I (ISBN 0-906773-05-9): 1 C; 2 g; 3 Bt; 4 d. This group of solo Sonatas was the only one Albinoni himself prepared for publication. The collective title of Trattenimenti Armonici was translated as "An Entertainment of Harmony" in the Walsh edition. Informative Preface. Clean edition with fine realizations and editorial comments clearly indicated. M-D.

_____. Two Chamber Sonatas Op.6/1 C, 2 A (W. Upmeyer — Nag 9).

_____. Three Sonatas Op.6/4 d, 5 F, 7 D (Reinhart — Hug). Cello part optional. No.4 is perhaps the finest in the set. M-D.

_____. Sonata g Op.6/2 (F. F. Polnauer — Schott 1967).

_____. Sonata a Op.6/6 (B. Paumgartner — Hug 1951). See VKDR, I: p.83.

_____. Sonata a (Schäffler — Nag). Cello part optional.

_____. Sonata b (Scheck, Ruf — Symphonia SY502). Cello part optional.

Amalie, Princess of Prussia.Sonata F (G. Lenzewski — Vieweg 108 1975) 8pp., parts for flute or violin. See detailed entry under duos for piano and flute.

Rene Amengual.Sonata 1943-44 (IU) 26pp., parts. Moderato: SA, |, freely tonal, flowing, imitation, centers around Bt; harmonic 9ths require large span. Recitado, libremente: declamatory opening; leads to Andante espressivo; flowing; hemiola; returns to dramatic opening mood to close out; centers freely around F. Presto: rondo, built on opening idea in piano, contrasting episodes. The whole work has an attractive gentle flowing quality about it. M-D.

Jan van Amerongen.Sonate I 1981 (Donemus 1982) 17pp., parts. 15 min. Andante rubato; Adagio; Molto allegro. Conventional writing for the late 20th century. M-D.

_____. Sonate II 1990 (Donemus 1991) 22pp., parts. 19 min. I. Fantasia: alternates between Adagio and Allegro non troppo in strongly contrasting characters. II. Largo: pensive with constantly repeated quarter notes. III. Scherzo: cast in 4 with many passages of fleeting 16th notes in octaves. M-D.

William Ames.Dust of Snow (CF 1946) 5pp., parts for violin and/or cello. Chordal with left-hand figuration. Descriptive. M-D.

_____. Sonata (CFE).

David Amram.Sonata 1960 (CFP 6686) 25pp., parts. 18 min. Allegro moderato; Andante espressivo; Theme and (8) Variations. Thoroughly 20th-century, much dissonance, expert handling of both instruments, eclectic. Effective alternation of contrasting moods. D.

Hendrik Andriessen.Sonate 1932 (Donemus 1948) 18pp., parts. 12 min. Allegro-Adagio-Allegro moderato; Adagio; Allegretto leggiero. Expressive writing often characterized by the contrast of lyric and dramatic qualities. M-D.

_____. Suite 1950 (Donemus 1950) 29pp., parts. Preludio; Fughetta; Air Varié; Finale. Parallelism and planing techniques found in both block and broken chords. Imitative features in Fughetto become less technical as movement progresses. M-D.

Jurriaan Andriessen.Sonate 1946 (Donemus 1950) 22pp., parts. Allegro molto; Molto lento; Allegro. Neoclassic. M-D.

_____. Quattro Movimenti 1992 (Donemus 1993) 14pp., parts. 8 min. Largo; Allegro; Largo; Allegro. M-D.

Louis Andriessen.Disco 1982 (Donemus 1982) 16pp., parts. 14 min. In one movement packed with changing meters in the outer sections of its ternary form. Octaves; harmonics; rhythmic complexities. Both instruments must be amplified. Performance notes included. M-D.

George Antheil.Works for Violin and Piano (R. Erickson — GS 3905 1995, ISBN 0-7935-5097-1) 207pp., parts. Sonata I, II, III, IV, Sonatina. Antheil entitled Sonata IV "No. 2" and apparently had in mind "to consolidate the Sonata No. 1 with the Third and ignore the Second, so that all the violin and piano sonatas before 1940 would be known as one work, called Sonata No. 1" (from Preface). Sonata I (1923). One movement. Relentless ostinatos, much repetition of rhythmic cells. Antheil throws overboard most traditions of Western music in this jarring Stravinsky/Bartok-influenced work. Sonata II (1923). One movement. Music-hall dance rhythms permeate everything. Instruments exchange glissandi. Slow foxtrot, habanera, and Charleston are given to the melodic violin while the piano pounds out an ostinato. Stringent polytonality infuses some of the popular elements with sarcastic jolts. Percussion is brought in only at the end (a la Ives?) in an Oriental duet with the violin. Musical humor at its best. Sonata III (1924). 12 min. One movement. There is little development in this work; thematic and rhythmic material are frequently repeated, sometimes in polytonal layers. Generally more subdued and longer than the first 2 Sonatas. Stravinskyisms are lightly sprinkled everywhere. Sonata IV (1947–48). Retrospectively, Antheil fashioned 3 extensive movements from Baroque and Classical forms, the first a Scherzo: Sonata-Allegro; second: Passacaglia Variations; third: Toccata-Rondo. The composer's explosive qualities are still apparent in this later work but to a lesser extent with less strident harmonies in the post-World War II work. Sonatina (1945). Three movements. Shostakovich influence shows in the opening march, which returns at the conclusion of the last movement, as well as the "wrong" notes in opening theme. Contrapuntal dissonance, Neoclassic sophistication. Manuscripts for all except Sonata IV at Library of Congress. Sonatas I, II, III, IV D. Sonatina M-D.

Pietro Degli Antonii.Three Sonatas Op.5/1,4, 6 (B. Paumgartner — Hug GH9339 1947) 31pp., parts. Preface in German, French, and English. 1. Con affetto; Vivace; Aria grave; Adagio; Allegro. 4. Grave; Aria–Vivace; Posato; Adagio; Vivace. 6. Adagio; Allegro; Grave; Vivace. These works have a personal physiognomy and an original style that date from the high Bolognese Baroque. They have a warm, pulsating, and dignified character about them and represent the finest type of chamber music from this period. Excellent edition. M-D.

Theodor Antoniou.Lyrics 1967 (Br 6103) 18pp., parts. These 7 short varied pieces present a free musical approach to forms of ancient lyric poetry. The verses are by the Greek poet Tassos Roussos and are based on ideas of the composer. If the verses are not recited during the performance, they should be printed in the program. Threnos; Epigram; Elegy; Nomos; Hymn; Ode; Skolion. Serial, some pointillistic treatment, harmonics, plucked strings, glissandi on strings, repetition as desired. A book is to be placed on strings covering specific pitches. Meaningful and expressive writing. M-D.

Attilio Ariosti.Two Sonatas (S. Renzo — DeSantis 982) 1 Et, 2 A. From Six Sonatas for viola d'amore contained in "Six Lessons for Viola d'amore."

_____. Sonata II transposed to D (Saint-George — Augener).

_____. Sonata e (Salmon — Ric R346).

_____. Sonata G (Salmon — Ric R347).

Thomas A. Arne.Sonata Bt (Craxton — OUP 20.007 1931) 5pp., parts. 4 min. Transcribed for violin or cello. Poco largo: serves as introduction, with short cadenza to Gavotta: much 8th-note figuration for piano. Charming, with purity of style. M-D.

Richard Arnell.Sonata II Op.55 (Schott 10214 1950) 23pp., parts. 14½ min. Vivace: chromatic alternation of hands; opening motif is main idea and is thoroughly worked over. Andante: same chromatic idea is transformed; piano gets some lyric melodic interest; repeated octaves; wide skips; ppp ending. Allegro vivace: bitonal cover conceals chromatic motif but is present in a rocking [??]; Presto coda, movement ends abruptly. M-D.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Piano in Chamber Ensemble by Maurice Hinson, Wesley Roberts. Copyright © 2006 Maurice Hinson and Wesley Roberts. Excerpted by permission of Indiana University Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Meet the Author

Maurice Hinson, one of the foremost authorities on piano literature, is Senior Professor of Piano at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Wesley Roberts is Professor of Music at Campbellsville University in Campbellsville, Kentucky.

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