The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher [NOOK Book]

Overview

Both entertaining and startling, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten offers one hundred philosophical puzzles that stimulate thought on a host of moral, social, and personal dilemmas. Taking examples from sources as diverse as Plato and Steven Spielberg, author Julian Baggini presents abstract philosophical issues in concrete terms, suggesting possible solutions while encouraging readers to draw their own conclusions:

Lively, clever, and ...
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The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten: 100 Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher

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Overview

Both entertaining and startling, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten offers one hundred philosophical puzzles that stimulate thought on a host of moral, social, and personal dilemmas. Taking examples from sources as diverse as Plato and Steven Spielberg, author Julian Baggini presents abstract philosophical issues in concrete terms, suggesting possible solutions while encouraging readers to draw their own conclusions:

Lively, clever, and thought-provoking, The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten is a portable feast for the mind that is sure to satisfy any intellectual appetite.



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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Ambrose Bierce dismissed philosophy as "a route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing"; but rightly seen, philosophy begins in an armchair and leads everywhere. To stimulate philosophical thinking, Julian Baggini's The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten proposes no fewer than 100 problems, ranging from Zeno's Paradox and Plato's Cave to cinematic conundrums like Groundhog Day and Minority Report.
Publishers Weekly
For Stelios, the teletransporter is the only way to travel." So begins one of the 100 philosophically based brain teasers in Baggini's clever book. Each entry includes an imagined scenario, which is based on sources from Plato to Sir Bernard Williams, followed by commentary that introduces a series of mind-bending questions and broadens the possible contexts: e.g., if Stelios's body is disintegrated and then recomposed by the transporter, is Stelios still the same person he was? Is it ever ethical to eat animals, even if they want to be eaten? Is there really an all-powerful, all-knowing and all-loving God? Is it right to do something wrong if it doesn't hurt anyone? Is torture ever a good option? Baggini, the editor of the U.K.'s Philosopher's Magazine, offers no firm answers, only hints as to where the discussion might go next. The conceit of the volume forces some repetitiveness and some simplification, but overall, it effectively explores aesthetics, ethics, language, logic, religion, mind and the self. More importantly, it's hugely entertaining. Any one of these thought experiments would serve as a great party game, keeping the conversation going for hours. (July) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101098073
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/27/2006
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 632,474
  • File size: 482 KB

Meet the Author

Julian Baggini is the editor of The Philosopher’s Magazine.
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Table of Contents

The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten Preface
Acknowledgements
A note on sources

1. The evil demon
2. Beam me up . . .
3. The Indian and the ice
4. A byte on the side
5. The pig that wants to be eaten
6. Wheel of fortune
7. When no one wins
8. Good God
9. Bigger Brother
10. The veil of ignorance
11. The ship Theseus
12. Picasso on the beach
13. Black, white and red all over
14. Bank error in your favour
15. Ordinary heroism
16. Racing tortoises
17. The torture option
18. Rationality demands
19. Bursting the sop bubble
20. Condemned to life
21. Land of the Epiphens
22. The lifeboat
23. The beetle in the box
24. Squaring the circle
25. Buridan's an ass
26. Pain's remains
27. Duties done
28. The nightmare scenario
29. Life dependency
30. Memories are made of this
31. Just so
32. Free Simone
33. The free-speech booth
34. Don't blame me
35. Last resort
36. Pre-emptive justice
37. Nature the artist
38. I am a brain
39. The Chinese room
40. The rocking-horse winner
41. Getting the blues
42. Take the money and run
43. Future shock
44. Till death us do part
45. The invisible gardener
46. Amoebaesque
47. Rabbit!
48. Evil genius
49. The hole in the sum of the parts
50. The good bribe
51. Living in a vat
52. More or less
53. Double trouble
54. The elusive I
55. Sustainable development
56. The total perspective vortex
57. Eating Tiddles
58. Divine command
59. The eyes have it
60. Do as I say, not as I do
61. Mozzarella moon
62. I think, therefore?
63. No know
64. Nipping the bud
65. Soul power
66. The forger
67. The poppadom paradox
68. Mad pain
69. The horror
70. An inspector calls
71. Life support
72. Free Percy
73. Being a bat
74. Water, water, everywhere
75. The ring of Gyges
76. Net head
77. The scapegoat
78. Gambling on God
79. A Clockwork Orange
80. Hearts and heads
81. Sense and sensibility
82. The freeloader
83. The golden rule
84. The pleasure principle
85. The nowhere man
86. Art for art's sake
87. Fair inequality
88. Total lack of recall
89. Kill and let die
90. Something we know not what
91. No one gets hurt
92. Autogovernment
93. Zombies
94. The Sorites tax
95. The problem of evil
96. Family first
97. Moral luck
98. The experience machine
99. Give peace a chance?
100. The Nest café
Index

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 10 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 5, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    The Book That Wants To Be Read

    This is definitely not a book anyone wants to pass up. I picked this book up from one of the B&N Stores and I never put it down. It is useful, complex, and wonderfully written. If you ever found yourself needing something to think about, this is the book for you. Ever thought about ethical behavior, existence of God, or the nature of reality? Baggini takes historical debates and places them in a contemporary context. Visit Descartes, Plato, Nietzsche, and other philosophers in different Thought Experiments. Who knows, maybe you will too become an Armchair Philosopher.<BR/><BR/>The book does not necessarily completely cover the realm of philosophy, only because there are only 100 Thought Experiments, however, it does cover topics such as The Brain vs. The Mind, The Problem of Self, The Nature of Reality, and Ethical Behavior. I strongly recommend this book to avid philosophy students and those with a curiousity for philosophy. No need to have any background in philosophy, Baggini takes you on the ride of your life and doesn't stop anytime soon.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    So interesting

    Best philosophy book ever

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Lots of Material for Thought

    As a management consultant, I find myself drawn more and more to the Philosopher's way of thinking as we deal with complex subjects that do not always lend themselves to simple Right or Wrong.

    This book contains quick snapshots of some of our major philosophical quandaries about rationality, morality and the line in the sand that differentiates between what is good and what can be viewed as evil (or immoral).

    This book provides a guide into how to deal with these intriguing matters. While it may not go deep enough into the subject, the very process of putting it out there for discussion is valuable in many ways. Especially for the management student. And we are all students regardless of our length of tenure in the field.

    I would also recommend this book for those forming new work teams. Its thought experiments and the way the teammates work through the process will yield a plethora of information that will guide the leader in team formation and areas of needed improvement. It's as if you were given a gift directly from the greatest leader of all time, the leader of the Endurance team.

    I hope you find this review / opinion helpful.

    Michael L Gooch, Author of Wingtips with Spurs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 6, 2009

    Creative Discussions

    I picked this book to create discussions with my son.He is Fifteen-plus.I left it out and around and I noticed his friends picking it up every so often. The title catches their notice first as did I.It is great to find out how deep or simple the conversation can become. Perhaps schools should work this way. Some teachers do. Plenty do not. It allows the person to ponder ideas.I want to ponder ideas too,so I rate "The Pig" very worthwhile.It wants you to have your own opinions,and have some fun too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2008

    Put your think caps on...

    I found this in the 'Thought Provoking' display at my local B&N bookseller. I have not been disappointed. I really like that the book makes references to other experiments at the end of each thought so that you can quickly read through thoughts on similar subject matters. I have read through it rather quickly, but I plan to re-read this later in the year and take some quality time to examine each of these experiments. This book is definitely worth the money and the time!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2006

    Provoking Thoughts...Brilliant!

    For those who like to think further than any superficial scenario or to re-think what you have thought. This book opens up many arguments from the many different degrees.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2006

    Things that make you go Hmm...

    Here is a book you simply cannot sit down and read in a single afternoon. In fact, I could only read, and really ponder, a few of these 'experiments' at a time. This books attacks and/or makes you think about a variety of subjects. Nothing is taboo. I read passages on vegetarian verses meat, religion of all types, the environment, political situations, many moral, social, and personal dilemmas, and even zombies! ..................... The author drew upon many sources. The title of this book is from an issue brought up in the well-known book 'The Restaurant At The End Of The Universe' by Douglas Adams. Not impressed? How about just some of the other sources, such as René Descartes, Thomas Nagel, David Hume, Antony Flew, and Bjorn Lomborg? .............. **** There is no need to be a doctor, professor, or anything else which requires higher education. Each experiment of philosophy is written in such a way that your intelligence will not be offended, no matter your normal or higher education status. If you are looking for a book that will make you actually sit back and THINK, then I highly suggest this one. ****

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 10 of 9 Customer Reviews

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