The Pig Who Went Home On Sundays: An Appalachian Folktale

Overview

In this home-grown version of The Three Little Pigs, the villain is, naturally, a fox the Appalachian red fox, who any local hunter will tell you in a worthy and cunning opponent.

An Appalachian variant of "The Three Little Pigs," in which Mama Pig sends her three sons out into the world with good advice that only one of them heeds.

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Overview

In this home-grown version of The Three Little Pigs, the villain is, naturally, a fox the Appalachian red fox, who any local hunter will tell you in a worthy and cunning opponent.

An Appalachian variant of "The Three Little Pigs," in which Mama Pig sends her three sons out into the world with good advice that only one of them heeds.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"If you have to build a house, build it out of rocks and bricks. And please come home and see your mama on Sunday." With this sage advice, Mama Pig sends her three little pigs out into the world. But the first two listen to a sly fox with dangerously spiky hair, who sells them on cornstalks and hay instead. Not surprisingly, they're eaten up with an enormous "Gulp!" In his variation on The Three Little Pigs, Davis spins a cautionary tale about heeding the words of grown-ups. The first two pigs pay the price of ignoring Mama's wisdom; the third chubby porker, Jackie, erects a solid home. At this point the plot line loses momentum as Jackie veers from savvy to gullible. He lets the fox into his home, inexplicably slamming the door on the animal's neck and tail, and only later realizes "he was the very thing the fox was planning to eat." Jackie does ultimately outfox his tricky stalker and makes it home for Sunday supper, but the uninflected writing and heavy-handed message, coupled with Mazzucco's (Little Johnny Buttermilk) flat illustrations in a muddy palette, may well have kids wishing for the classic's huffing and puffing wolf. Ages 4-7. (July) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Most of us grew up with a version of this story. We probably called it "The Three Little Pigs," and if we grew up in the Disney generation, we probably remember the happy pigs dancing and singing at the end, gleeful about outsmarting the wolf. But this is an earlier, less sanitized version of this cautionary tale, and the little pigs who don't do what their mother told them to do and instead build their homes of corn stalks and hay, never make it to their brother's brick house to sing and dance. They have already been eaten by the fox. Some children, already used to the more modern version of the story, may object to this ending, insisting that this is not the way the story goes. But families who enjoy original folktales will undoubtedly like this version. The text is somewhat wordy and a bit flat and the illustrations, though colorful and lively, are not particularly attractive. Still many families will enjoy sharing this book. 2004, August House LittleFolk, Ages 5 to 8.
—Barbara Carroll Roberts
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-This charming version of "The Three Little Pigs" weaves mountain wisdom into a readable story with just the right amount of repetition for sharing aloud. Mama Pig sends out her youngsters one by one with the admonition, "Now, let me tell you two things: If you have to build a house, build it out of rocks and bricks. And please come home and see your mama on Sunday." Needless to say, a slick-suited, fast-talking fox hoodwinks the first two pigs and then swallows each of them in one gulp. The last pig builds a brick house. The fox manages to talk his way in, but he's so tired from the effort that he falls asleep by the fireplace. This pig cleverly figures out a way to get rid of the predator and makes it to Mama's house on Sunday. The illustrations are big and bright with scenery that echoes the Appalachian Mountains. Blue skies dance with shooting stars and billowy smoke. There are painterly brush strokes evident in the fox, which add to his shifty nature. An endnote relates an entertaining personal anecdote about the story and provides a brief explanation of its history. A fine addition to folktale collections.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780874835717
  • Publisher: August House Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/28/2005
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,232,598
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD630L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.76 (w) x 11.34 (h) x 0.41 (d)

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