Pilgrim's Progress (Moody Classics Series)
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Pilgrim's Progress (Moody Classics Series)

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by John Bunyan, Rosalie De Rosset, Rosalie DeRosset
     
 

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This is not a devotional classic; it is a dangerous tale.

One of the most widely read books of all time, this adventure reveals John Bunyan's intense grasp of the Scriptures. Penned while in prison for refusing to compromise the gospel, The Pilgrim's Progress is a guide for the journey from death to life. The times have changed, but the

Overview

This is not a devotional classic; it is a dangerous tale.

One of the most widely read books of all time, this adventure reveals John Bunyan's intense grasp of the Scriptures. Penned while in prison for refusing to compromise the gospel, The Pilgrim's Progress is a guide for the journey from death to life. The times have changed, but the landmarks and adversaries are very much the same.

The Pilgrim's Progress is a call to the high stakes of every Christian's journey. Don't pick it up expecting quaint amusement; it is a story of the undeniable truth, great cost, and overwhelming joy of the gospel. 

Note on the Moody Classics series:
Many factors influence our spiritual growth and development, and Christian classics play a key role. Learning from those who have walked the path and fought the fight brings wisdom and strengthens resolve. And hearing the familiar chords of kingdom living sung by voices from other times can penetrate cultural barriers that limit our allegiance to the King. To this end, Moody Publishers is honored to build an ongoing series of spiritual classics. Selected for their enduring influence and timeless perspective, these new editions promise to shape the lives of spiritual pilgrims for generations to come.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802456540
Publisher:
Moody Publishers
Publication date:
10/01/2007
Series:
Moody Classics Series
Pages:
219
Sales rank:
671,632
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.44(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One


In my journey through the wilderness of this world there came a time when I found myself caged up in a very dreary dungeon. Now how I came to be in that place, and what befell me there, is not for me to relate in this little book. What is for me to tell is the story of my dream. For, you see, while I was shut up in that most loathsome place surrounded by profligates and felons, I seemed to breathe the very atmosphere of heaven. Yea, 'twas there that I laid me down to sleep; and, as I slept, I dreamed a most wonderful dream.

    In this amazing dream I saw before me the most miserable man I have ever seen. He stood before the front door of a very tumble-down and miserable excuse of a house. He was dressed in garments that would scarcely merit the title of clothing in the genteel place where you dwell. Rags is what they really were! More frayed and tattered than the clothing on any bag-man beggar you are ever like to see. His face was very sad and was, for the better part of the time, turned away from his house. In his right hand he held a little black book, and upon his back he bore a huge burden—a great big black bundle of a burden that looked as if it must shortly press him down to the ground. 'Twas a very mysterious burden that he carried, for, as large and heavy as it looked to me, I soon perceived that it was invisible to those about him. But you can be sure that it was quite real to him; aye, just as real to him as the burdens of your soul are real to you.

    Now, as I beheld in my dream, I saw him open the book and read; and, as he read, he began to weep and tremble. He bowed lower andlower, as if his weighty burden was somehow growing even heavier. Finally, unable to endure any longer, he cried out with the most mournful voice I have ever heard, saying, "Oh, alas! Woe is me. Woe, woe, woe! Is there no one to help me?"

    But to his despairing cry there came neither answer nor reply. He looked left, down the winding, twisting lanes of his tumble-down town and saw nothing but other people clothed in rags just as patched and worn as his own. He looked right, up the twisting, winding streets of his tumble-down town, and again saw nothing but more people in the same miserable state. In this dejected frame of mind he turned to enter his little tottering shack of a house. Once within that dreary little one-candle cottage, he tried his very best to act as normal as possible, lest he should alarm his wife and young children. But, try as he might, he could not contain the moans and groans that forced themselves from unwilling lips. Finally, noticing that his wife and children kept stealing quick, sideways glances at him, and seeing that keeping his silence only seemed to add to his sorrows, he decided to open his heart to his loved ones. And this is what he said:

    "Oh, my dear wife, and you, my tender children! I, your poor father, am all lost and undone. And why all lost and undone, do you ask? 'Tis because of this huge burden strapped tightly to my back."

    Then said his dubious wife, Christiana, "Uh, burden? What burden, my dear?"

    "I don't see any burden, Papa," piped up Matthew, his eldest son. To this the man replied,

    "Can you truly not see it?"

    "No," they chorused, all as one voice.

    "Oh dear! What can I say?" he groaned. "For whether you can see it or no, this weight is about to crush out my life!"

    "Dear, dear," said his wife, her brow deeply furrowed with grave concern, "An invisible burden so heavy as to crush out your life? What can it be?"

    "Hear me! Hear me well, my dear ones. I have been reading words from this my little book."

    At this his family exchanged one of those knowing glances that shouted silently, "Oh no! We were afraid something like this was going to happen."

    At last Samuel, with strained politeness, ventured to ask, "And uh ... ahem, what do the words in your little book say, dear father?"

    "They tell me that this, our city, will soon be burned with fire from heaven!"

    "What!" cried his ashen-faced wife, with a shocked expression. "Burned down!"

    "Yes! Burned to ashes!"

    "No!"

    "Yes!" he insisted, even more earnestly. "And in that fearful overthrow, we shall all miserably come to our ruin!"

    "Oh, my dear husband!" she exclaimed, dropping her head into her hands with a moan.

    "And, as for a way of escape," he added despairingly, "I can see none."

    "None!" she exploded.

    "None?" cried Joseph, fearfully.

    "Nun?" burbled baby James.

    "No, none! None at all," he answered sorrowfully. "We are doomed to perish with this miserable town of Destruction!"

    Now at these words his family was put into a state of shock. Not that they believed that what he had told them was true, mind you. Oh no! Certainly not! But rather because they conceived that he had gone stark raving mad! Therefore, since it was getting on toward evening, they served him a spot of hot tea with a touch of lemon and honey, wrapped his neck with a heavy, grey woolen rag, and bundled him off to bed. "There," said his wife as she latched the door quietly behind her, "A good night's sleep ought to settle his brains a bit."

    But the night was just as troublesome to him as the day. Therefore, instead of sleeping peacefully, he tossed to his left and cried out: "Ah, woe is me! Lost and undone am I! All lost and undone!" Then there would be sighs and tears as he rolled onto his right moaning, "Ah, what shall become of me, wicked man that I am?" And so he spent the long lingering hours of darkness.

    Now when morning was finally come, Matthew, his eldest, donned his sunniest smile and cheerfully addressed him saying, "Are you feeling happier now, dear father?"

    "Yes, how goes it with you, dear husband?" sighed Christiana, trying her best to squeeze a touch of optimism into her fatigued voice.

    "Worse!" he moaned.

    "Worse!"

    "Yes! Worse and yet more worse!" he continued.

    "Oh, dear!" she cried with more impatience than concern. "What more can we do for you, poor man?"

    To this he answered, desperately, "We must set ourselves to study and pray that we may know how to escape this city of Destruction."

    "Escape!" she exploded, "My dear husband! There is nothing to escape from! Now come to your senses before the magistrates declare you to be a lunatic and cage you up forever!"

    "No! No!" He cried. "I am in my right mind. There is danger—and we must escape forthwith. But how? Only how?"

    "Husband!" snapped Christiana, her pot of anger beginning to boil over, "come to yourself this instant!"

    Now, thoroughly convinced that their husband and father was indeed going quite mad, they sought to drive his affliction away by treating him with the utmost hardness and disrespect. Sometimes they would scold him, sometimes mock and mimic him. At other times they would totally ignore him. But, as you well know, this is no way to treat a soul in distress. Not only did it fail to help him, it actually added to his burden because now he began to fear all the more for his family's salvation.

    This added burden of worry drove him more often than ever to his chamber where he would pray for their souls as well as his own. At other times he would walk all alone in the fields, sometimes reading from his book, and sometimes praying. And thus for many a day did he spend his time.

    Now, as my dream unfolded, I saw him once again walking in the fields. He was, as before, reading in his little book, and still groaning under his heavy burden, which, by now, was even larger than before. At last he burst out as he had done earlier, crying: "Oh wretched man that I am! What shall I do to be saved?" And, as before, so now again, there was no reply.

    I saw also that he cast hungry eyes this way to the left, and that way to the right, seeking some place to flee for his escape. Yet he continued to stand, trembling, out in the midst of the field, because, as I perceived, he could not tell which way to go. Then, from the right, I saw a man named Evangelist approaching, who addressed him thus, "Good day, Christian."

    "Good day," moaned the man woefully. "But, pray tell, sir, why did you address me as Christian?"

    "Because if you continue to read from that little book in your hand, a Christian is what you must surely become," said Evangelist with joyful assurance.

    "Hmm. Even though my name is now 'Graceless'?" asked the man doubtfully.

    "Aye," said Evangelist earnestly. "Though your name should be called death itself, yet would the reading of that Word give you life!"

    At this, a look of great puzzlement came over Christian's face, and he asked sincerely, "How can these things be?"

(Continues...)


Excerpted from The New Amplified Pilgrim's Progress by James Pappas, Jr. (adapted from John Bunyan's original text). Copyright © 1999 by Orion's Gate. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Meet the Author


JOHN BUNYAN (1628-1688) was a Puritan preacher and writer in England. Bunyan had very little schooling. He followed his father in the tinker's trade, and served in the parliamentary army from 1644 to 1647. In 1655, Bunyan became a deacon and began preaching. He experienced marked success from the start and was the pastor of the Bedford church.

Bunyan is the author of The Pilgrim's Progress which he wrote in 1676 while imprisoned for preaching without a license. His numerous other titles include Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners and Holy War.

DR. ROSALIE DE ROSSET is a professor of Literature, English and Homiletics at Moody Bible Institute where she has been for forty-two years. She earned her M.A. in English from Northeastern Illinois University, M.Div. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Rhetoric from The University of Illinois at Chicago. In addition to teaching, she regularly appears on Moody Broadcasting Network programs as a guest and co-host, and speaks at conferences and seminars. She lives on the northside of Chicago.

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The Pilgrim's Progress 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 77 reviews.
Beasliffe More than 1 year ago
The book is excellent, but the folks at B&N should be embarrassed to offer this badly scanned nook book edition. Notes and marginal comments appear in-line in the same font as the text and interrupt the flow of reading. Words are sometimes split randomly or shift in their middle between plain and italic. Words that should be bolded aren't. Poetry is set as prose at random. Apostrophes are mis-scanned as question marks. Apparently no one bothered to proofread the scan results. The editorial notes also detract from the text on which they are supposed to comment. since they are often trivial and sometimes plain wrong. This is truly a sorry transfer from text to ebook and unworthy of Bunyan's masterpiece.
Jess_MacCallum More than 1 year ago
There is a reason this book has not been out of print since it was first published in the late 1670s. It remains relevant. One of the most insightful and honest descriptions of the Christian Life, far better than modern writers can even come close. It is the quintessential Christian allegory, ahead even of Chronicles of Narnia. Brilliant insights, life-changing.
John McAllister More than 1 year ago
Though an exhilirating tale of adventure and grandiose excitement if epic proportions it is still so much more than that. NEVER a substitute for the Word of God, but a wonderful contemporary study guide piece that every christian should read and will enjoy when presented with the opportunity!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It seems a lot of the footnotes, etc., get jumbled in with the text. It's frustrating to navigate.
BigBobHev More than 1 year ago
This is a great read of an allegory about a man's travelling the path of life being akin to a man's attempt at travelling the path to religious redemption. The writing style is, of course, heroic-epic; and, the author does an admirable job at staying true to the character and the plot. I recommend it to anyone whom appreciates epic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book contains a very detailed table of contents, and a different formatting of the inline references (which makes it easier to read than most other versions of this book that I've seen). Great book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wrong book here! This is some other kind of allegory or story--not anything Bunyan would have liked.   Seems a Catholic kind of tale.  It is a scam, as it is NOT Pilgrim's Progress on the inside.   Please correct the title and description of it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pilgrim's Progress is a wonderful allegory of our Christian walk. It is so wonderfully written, despite the fact that John Bunyan only had an eigth grade education. I love how Scripture is continually intertwined with the characters' dialouge. I also enjoyed the story of Christiana who later falls in her husband's footsteps.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is inspirational and makes me think about my relationship with Christ, but it is a very long, drawn out book and, as a ninth grader, is difficult to always understand. The book is about Christian, as he travels along the narrow road to the Celestial City. It applies all that is said in the Bible about how we should act as we live life and face struggles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book get 5 stars right off the back. the only set back is reading the old english. basically this book is about Christian going on an adventure to the celestial city, and runs into fearsome dangers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very touching and inspirational. The trials of life can be challenging however, faith, hope, and love can lead us towards the kingdom of God to heaven. A wonderful book.
Anonymous 7 months ago
This is not The Pilgrim's Progress! Do not waste your money
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
At first the story seemed pointless and then as I conntinued, it became clear that the story is intended to show the way to a sinless state of mind in order to achieve life everlasting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A masterpiece. I read it about once a year.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A classic that opens up people miind on what it might be like wen you have two patss to choose from. I realy like this story because it gives you an idea whht it would belike if you went down the wrong path, as well as right path too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The table of contents works well and there are footnotes to obscure words that work good well too. Cant believe its free.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I purchased the ebook version of this book and was greatly pleased. This version is much clearer than the "public domain" version that is available for free. As for the book, it truly is a classic and I enjoyed it immensely. Christians will find it particularly useful but nonchristians can enjoy it as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a former Catholic I read this book (modern English children's version) for a VBS missionary story time and it turned on the light bulb of salvation. I love this old English version as it keeps true to the time period in which it was written. I visualize the scenes so vividly. It's an awesome book to share with a new Christian.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago