The Pilot Guide to Takeoff Safety

The Pilot Guide to Takeoff Safety

by FAA
     
 
The Pilot Guide to Takeoff Safety is designed to reduce the number of RTO related accidents by improving the pilot’s decision making and associated procedural accomplishment through increased knowledge and awareness of the factors affecting the successful outcome of the “Go/No Go” decision. This book explains V1, the balanced field concept,

Overview

The Pilot Guide to Takeoff Safety is designed to reduce the number of RTO related accidents by improving the pilot’s decision making and associated procedural accomplishment through increased knowledge and awareness of the factors affecting the successful outcome of the “Go/No Go” decision. This book explains V1, the balanced field concept, factors effecting performance and Crew Resource Management.

Note: This book discusses turbo jet aircraft.

Table of Contents:
2.0 Introduction
2 .1 Objectives
2.2 “Successful Versus Unsuccessful” Go/No Go Decisions
2.2.1 An In-service Perspective On Go/No Go Decisions
2.2.2 “Successful” Go/No Go Decisions
2.2.3 RTO Overrun Accidents and Incidents
2.2.4 Statistics
2.2.5 Lessons Learned
2.3 Decisions and Procedures—What Every Pilot Should Know
2.3.1 The Takeoff Rules—The Source of the Data
2.3.1.1 The “FAR” Takeoff Field Length
2.3.1.2 V1 Speed Defined
2.3.1.3 Balanced Field Defined
2.3.1.4 (Not Used
2.3.2 Transition to the Stopping Configuration
2.3.2.1 Flight Test Transitions
2.3.2.2 Airplane Flight Manual Transition Times
2.3.3 Comparing the “Stop” and “Go” Margins
2.3.3.1 The “Stop” Margins
2.3.3.2 The “Go” Option
2.3.4 Operational Takeoff Calculations
2.3.4.1 The Field Length Limit Weight
2.3.4.2 Actual Weight Less Than Limit Weight
2.3.5 Factors that Affect Takeoff and RTO Performance
2.3.5.1 Runway Surface Condition
2.3.5.1.1 Hydroplaning
2.3.5.1.2 The Final Stop
2.3.5.2 Atmospheric Condition
2.3.5.3 Airplane Configuration
2.3.5.3.1 Flaps
2.3.5.3.2 Engine Bleed Air
2.3.5.3.3 Missing or Inoperative Equipment
2.3.5.3.4 Wheels, Tires, and Brakes
2.3.5.3.5 Worn Brakes
2.3.5.3.6 Residual Brake Energy
2.3.5.3.7 Speedbrake Effect on Wheel Braking
2.3.5.3.8 Carbon and Steel Brake Differences
2.3.5.3.9 High Brake Energy RTOs
2.3.5.4 Reverse Thrust Effects
2.3.5.5 Runway Parameters
2.3.5.6 (Not Used
2.3.5.7 Takeoffs Using Reduced Thrust
2.3.5.8 The Takeoff Data the Pilot Sees
2.3.6 Increasing the RTO Safety Margins
2.3.6.1 Runway Surface Condition
2.3.6.2 Flap Selection
2.3.6.3 Runway Lineup
2.3.6.4 Setting Takeoff Thrust
2.3.6.5 Manual Braking Techniques
2.3.6.6 Antiskid Inoperative Braking Techniques
2.3.6.7 RTO Autobrakes
2.3.6.8 (Not Used
2.3.6.9 The V1 Call
2.3.6.10 Crew Preparedness
2.4 Crew Resource Management
2.4.1 CRM and the RTO
2.4.2 The Takeoff Briefing
2.4.3 Callouts
2.4.4 The Use of All Crew Members
2.4.5 Summary

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013223097
Publisher:
IndependentFlightInstructors.com
Publication date:
10/26/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
45
Sales rank:
967,857
File size:
489 KB

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