The Piper at the Gates of Dawn

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Steve Huey
The title of Pink Floyd's debut album is taken from a chapter in Syd Barrett's favorite children's book, The Wind in the Willows, and the lyrical imagery of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is indeed full of colorful, childlike, distinctly British whimsy, albeit filtered through the perceptive lens of LSD. Barrett's catchy, melodic acid pop songs are balanced with longer, more experimental pieces showcasing the group's instrumental freak-outs, often using themes of space travel as metaphors for hallucinogenic experiences -- "Astronomy Domine" is a poppier number in this vein, but tracks like "Interstellar Overdrive" are some of the earliest forays into what has been tagged ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Steve Huey
The title of Pink Floyd's debut album is taken from a chapter in Syd Barrett's favorite children's book, The Wind in the Willows, and the lyrical imagery of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is indeed full of colorful, childlike, distinctly British whimsy, albeit filtered through the perceptive lens of LSD. Barrett's catchy, melodic acid pop songs are balanced with longer, more experimental pieces showcasing the group's instrumental freak-outs, often using themes of space travel as metaphors for hallucinogenic experiences -- "Astronomy Domine" is a poppier number in this vein, but tracks like "Interstellar Overdrive" are some of the earliest forays into what has been tagged space rock. But even though Barrett's lyrics and melodies are mostly playful and humorous, the band's music doesn't always bear out those sentiments -- in addition to Rick Wright's eerie organ work, dissonance, chromaticism, weird noises, and vocal sound effects are all employed at various instances, giving the impression of chaos and confusion lurking beneath the bright surface. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn successfully captures both sides of psychedelic experimentation -- the pleasures of expanding one's mind and perception, and an underlying threat of mental disorder and even lunacy; this duality makes Piper all the more compelling in light of Barrett's subsequent breakdown, and ranks it as one of the best psychedelic albums of all time.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/27/2011
  • Label: Parlophone (Wea)
  • UPC: 603497915040
  • Catalog Number: 791504
  • Sales rank: 20,015

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Astronomy Domine (4:12)
  2. 2 Lucifer Sam (3:07)
  3. 3 Matilda Mother (3:08)
  4. 4 Flaming (2:46)
  5. 5 Pow R. Toc. H (4:26)
  6. 6 Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk (3:06)
  7. 7 Interstellar Overdrive (9:40)
  8. 8 The Gnome (2:13)
  9. 9 Chapter 24 (3:42)
  10. 10 The Scarecrow (2:11)
  11. 11 Bike (3:23)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Pink Floyd Primary Artist
Syd Barrett Guitar, Vocals
Roger Waters Bass Guitar, Vocals
Nick Mason Drums
Richard Wright Organ, Piano, Vocals
Technical Credits
Syd Barrett Composer, Cover Design
Roger Waters Composer
Nick Mason Composer
Richard Wright Composer
James Guthrie Mastering
Norman Smith Producer
Vic Singh Original Cover Photography
Chris Walters Band Photo
Joel Plante Mastering
Colin Prime Band Photo
Andrew Whittuck Band Photo
Peter Brown Engineer
Dezo Hoffman Band Photo
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    From The Imcomprehensible To The Indelible

    Pink Floyd has re-issued all of their albums recently with the tag-line "Why Pink Floyd?" Anyone who has an interest in this band will definitely enjoy these re-releases, two in particular. The first one being "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn", released in 1967. It was at this time that the creative driving force of the band was Syd Barrett, their vocalist, guitarist and chief songwriter, who also had a habit of consuming large amounts of LSD. So, listening to this album today is almost the equivalent of an LSD trip: it's sometimes funny, it's something scary and it's mostly incomprehensible. Just the song titles alone were incomprehensible---"Astronomy Domine", "Lucifer Sam", "Interstellar Overdrive", "Take Up Thy Stethscope And Walk", etc. Barrett obviously had a great, loopy talent and you listen to this record and wonder what it must have been like to see Pink Floyd in concert at that time. One might be tempted to give "Piper" a five-star rating just for the fact that it was the only Pink Floyd album with Barrett's complete involvement. But I challenge anybody out there to tell me what "Pow R. Toc H." means. Barrett became more unstable, almost catatonic in concerts. He was soon replaced by the more adept and reliable David Gilmour. Barrett would record two solo albums but he soon withdrew from public life completely. Over the next few years, Pink Floyd soldiered on with bassist Roger Waters taking over as lead singer and songwriter, sometimes using the demented legacy of Barrett as a backdrop for their songs. The band recorded a number of albums like "Ummagumma" and "Atom Heart Mother" (they also recorded the soundtrack of the film "Zabriskie Point"), all of which suffered from a lack of musical direction. That, however, began to change in 1971 when Pink Floyd released "Meddle". The instrumental opening, "One Of These Days", was perhaps the first indication that the band was finally emerging from the shadow of Syd Barrett. However, the album's centerpiece is "Echoes", a 23-minute song filled with long fade-ins, sound effects, guitar and keyboard solos and Waters' moody, airy vocals conveying a sense of societal disconnect. These motifs would be carried over more than well on their next album, "Dark Side Of The Moon", as well as future albums. "Piper" barely saw any release here in America. Few in America knew who Syd Barrett was. Yet, when Pink Floyd became successful in America, particularly on "Wish You Were Here" and "The Wall", it was under the long shadow of that troubled man.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews