The Pirate Princess and Other Fairy Tales

The Pirate Princess and Other Fairy Tales

by Neil Philip, Mark Weber
     
 

Princesses and poor men, rascals and reversals: In seven fairy tales rich in story, beauty, and meaning, Neil Philip and Mark Weber celebrate the incredible work of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav.

Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav said, "If one is to believe what people say, stories are written to put them to sleep. I tell mine to wake them up." In this first-ever

Overview


Princesses and poor men, rascals and reversals: In seven fairy tales rich in story, beauty, and meaning, Neil Philip and Mark Weber celebrate the incredible work of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav.

Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav said, "If one is to believe what people say, stories are written to put them to sleep. I tell mine to wake them up." In this first-ever collection of his tales for a general audience, a princess becomes a pirate in her quest for her one true love; a poor man hopes to uncover treasure in a faraway city; a young prince suffers from a mysterious malady; and a fixer shows the king the way to happiness. These seven stories of dreamers and doers are beautifully retold by master folklorist Neil Philip, with jewel-toned Chagallesque illustrations by noted artist Mark Weber.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Booklsit
Philip, Neil. The Pirate Princess and Other Fairy Tales. Illus. by Mark Weber. 2005. 96p. Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine, $19.99 (0-590-10855-7). 398.2.
Gr. 4–6. This handsome, large-format volume contains seven fairy tales adapted from the stories written by seventeenth-century Hasidic rabbi Nahman ben Simha, whose recognition of the way traditional tales are constructed predates that of most folklorists. An informative four-page introduction discusses Nahman and his storytelling. The lively collection of varied tales begins with the story of a princess who turns pirate to escape unwanted suitors and rejoin the man she loves. Several of the other stories share elements of adventure, true love, promises, quests, and fortune. The most memorable is “The Turkey Prince,” which has wit and wisdom in equal measure. Weber's many gouache paintings have the stylistic feeling of Chagall. From full-page scenes to small vignettes, they capture the wit, drama, and occasional comedy of the tales. The book concludes with extensive notes, in which Philip discusses the origins and meanings of the stories as well as his reasoning when changing the original text. The bibliography that follows is divided into three parts: Rabbi Nahman, Jewish mysticism and folklore, and general folklore. A lively, appealing collection. –Carolyn Phelan

SLJ
Gr 5 Up–Philip has retold four fairy tales and three short parables attributed to Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, a noted Hasidic Jewish scholar and teacher in the early 19th century. The stories, most of which contain elements of universal fairy tales, were told to his disciples, and most have references to the coming of the messiah and the redemption of the world. Stylized gouache paintings range in size from smaller vignettes to full page. The larger illustrations have a layered look that appears to result from the use of color upon color combined with areas of stamped design. Contrasting colors and floating or juxtaposed segments evoke images of Chagall paintings. Notes on each tale cover its origin, allegorical representations, and variations in detail. More compelling versions of two of these tales can be found in Howard Schwartz's Elijah's Violin and Other Jewish Fairy Tales (Oxford Univ., 1994) and in Uri Shulevitz's The Treasure (Farrar, 1979). Synagogue and Jewish day school libraries may want to have Philip's collection on hand.–Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH

Publishers Weekly
The Pirate Princess: And Other Fairy Tales by Neil Philip, illus. by Mark Weber, will appeal to those looking for unusual fairy tales. Philip here retells the stories of Rabbi Nahman Ben Simha, who lived at the time of the Brothers Grimm. The title story tells of a boy and girl destined to be together by a pact made before their birth but who are separated by two kingdoms on opposite sides of the world; the princess confronts many dangers in her search for her love, but uses her wit to survive. Weber's artwork often emulates a Chagall-like palette and perspective. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-Philip has retold four fairy tales and three short parables attributed to Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, a noted Hasidic Jewish scholar and teacher in the early 19th century. The stories, most of which contain elements of universal fairy tales, were told to his disciples, and most have references to the coming of the messiah and the redemption of the world. Stylized gouache paintings range in size from smaller vignettes to full page. The larger illustrations have a layered look that appears to result from the use of color upon color combined with areas of stamped design. Contrasting colors and floating or juxtaposed segments evoke images of Chagall paintings. Notes on each tale cover its origin, allegorical representations, and variations in detail. More compelling versions of two of these tales can be found in Howard Schwartz's Elijah's Violin and Other Jewish Fairy Tales (Oxford Univ., 1994) and in Uri Shulevitz's The Treasure (Farrar, 1979). Synagogue and Jewish day school libraries may want to have Philip's collection on hand.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590108553
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 11.22(h) x 0.24(d)
Lexile:
890L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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