The Player Gods

The Player Gods

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by Kenneth Tucker
     
 

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He awoke in Chicago with a name no one had ever heard and discovered that he was a private eye. And the year was 1940, but a 1940 that somehow he knew was not historical. For no one knew of Hitler and the Axis and the European war that would engulf the world. Fairies and trolls were among the city’s inhabitants. Moreover, Chicago was being ravaged by a peculiar

Overview

He awoke in Chicago with a name no one had ever heard and discovered that he was a private eye. And the year was 1940, but a 1940 that somehow he knew was not historical. For no one knew of Hitler and the Axis and the European war that would engulf the world. Fairies and trolls were among the city’s inhabitants. Moreover, Chicago was being ravaged by a peculiar plague that caused madness and then spontaneous combustion of human beings. He himself was suspected of colluding with his wealthy client, Bianca Danielle, in the recent murder of her husband. Then he is charged with her murder, but has no recollection of his killing her. But then the clocks begin ticking backwards toward the hour of her brutal death.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781625172372
Publisher:
Kenneth Tucker
Publication date:
06/23/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
358
File size:
1 MB

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Meet the Author

Dr. Kenneth Tucker was born December 2, 1940, in Louisville, Kentucky. He received his B. A. (1963) and his M.A (1965) from the University of Louisville. In 1970 he received his Ph. D. from the University of Kentucky. In that same year he was employed by Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, where was promoted to full professor and continued to teach until his full retirement in 2001. His academic specialties are Shakespeare and literature of the Renaissance—fields in which he remains active.

He has written articles on such diverse writers as H. G. Wells, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Shakespeare, C. S. Lewis, H. P. Lovecraft, Thomas Middleton, John Ford, and Beaumont and Fletcher. He has reviewed books and British productions of Shakespeare’s plays for the Shakespeare Newsletter.

Upon retiring, Dr. Tucker has devoted himself to writing, producing Eliot Ness and the Untouchables,(2n.ed, 2012) and Shakespeare and Jungian Typology (2003). Among his novels are A Wilderness of Tigers (2005), based upon the savage rampage of Kentucky’s Harpe brothers, The Grave and the Figure Eight (2006), a retelling of the Tristan-Isolde story set in Kentucky, and The Fall of the House of Spade, (2007) a tale of murder and revenge set in Western Kentucky. A Kentucky Colonel in King Arthur’s Court (2006) is a very different sort of novel, a comical fantasy. The Madonna of Shadows and Darkness, (2008) is a supernatural thriller and spiritual allegory, is set in contemporary Louisville. His Kentucky-set Civil War novel I Pray the Lord My Soul to Keep appeared in 2010. His latest novel is Hell Is Where the Heart Is (2012), a spoof of university administrative life.

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The Player Gods 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Karen Pirnot for Readers' Favorite If you'd like a truly thought-provoking science fiction read, you might try picking up a copy of Kenneth Tucker's The Player Gods. You have to follow all the characters in the beginning chapters in order to get the gist of the story, but it is worth the mental effort when you get into the book. Basically, the author has created various facets of Jungian theory and incorporated them into his characters. Chicago in the 1940s is chosen as a site in which people may go and become what they have seen in their dreams. People can pretend they are in various roles and enjoy the enrichment of a realistic replication of their wishes. One such character is Metzingergarstein and he is placed in Chicago as a private investigator. When he awakens to find himself in the role, he has no immediate comprehension of what or who he is. But he understands he has been hired to solve the mystery of the death of an important man in town. He is immediately attracted to the deceased man's widow, Blanca Danielle, and he has no idea that the widow harbors secrets which will open windows to the universe. The Player Gods becomes even more complicated when author Tucker introduces the various Jungian facets of sensation, cognition, emotion, and the human psyche into the plot and we discover that a mastermind has been moving people about with reckless abandon and intriguing machinations. You'll have to concentrate with this book, but if you're a science fiction buff, you'll probably eat it up.