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The Poetical Works of Ebenezer Elliott
     

The Poetical Works of Ebenezer Elliott

by Ebenezer Elliott
 

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 Excerpt: ...in his breast: Self-fired, and blasted, but forgiv'n, Let Robert's ashes rest. ERIN, A DIRGE, FOR APRIL, 1847. Oh, for snow, strange April snow, Cold and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 Excerpt: ...in his breast: Self-fired, and blasted, but forgiv'n, Let Robert's ashes rest. ERIN, A DIRGE, FOR APRIL, 1847. Oh, for snow, strange April snow, Cold and cheap! a shroud of woe For pale dead Erin's nakedness! Snow-clad Broom, oh, drooping broom, Hearse of snow, of plumes a plume, Weep over Erin coffinless! There are colder things than snow, Sadder things than death and woe, Proud Rapine's cold hard-heartedness! And that saddest, helpless pain Which, when struck, strikes not again! Now wordless, lifeless, coffinless. Insect, that would'st God enthrall! Earning nought and taking all! ERIN, A DIRGE, FOR APRIL, 1847. 225 Art thou thy country's nothingness? Man! whom that vile insect's will Yet may torture, starve, and kill! Remember Erin coffinless. How men treat subjected man, When they may do what they can, Well knows scourged India's wofulness; Well, Bengal, thy famish'd dead (Victim-myriads o'er thee spread!) Forespoke of Erin coffinless. Oh, thou snow-clad forest-bough! In thy sun-lit glory now, Laugh not at death's wide wastefulness; But lament, while brightly glows April's noon o'er Winter snows, A nation dead and coffinless! And--oh! pale unshrouded one, Cover' d by the heav'ns alone! A white sheet now shall cover thee: Help is vain, but help is nigh; And thy friend, the pitying sky Shall throw a cold sheet over thee. VOL. II. RHYMED RAMBLES. IN THREE PARTS. PREFACE. If Mr. Housman of Lune Banks had not sent me a copy of his collection of English sonnets, I should have been the author of one sonnet only. I never liked the measure of the legitimate or Petrarchan sonnet. There is a disagreeable break in the melody, after the eighth line. That Milton felt this, is proved by the fact, that he frequently ran the eighth line into the ninth, contrary to law. N...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940033559800
Publisher:
H.S. King
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
455 KB

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