The Poetical Works, Of John Milton

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SAMSON AGONISTES. DRAMATIC POEM fragtcdia est imitatio actionis seriae, andc. per misericordiam et metum perficiens talium aiTectuum lustrationem. OF THAT SORT OF DRAMATIC POEM' WHICH IB CALLED TRAGEDY. Traoedy, as it was ...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
SAMSON AGONISTES. DRAMATIC POEM fragtcdia est imitatio actionis seriae, andc. per misericordiam et metum perficiens talium aiTectuum lustrationem. OF THAT SORT OF DRAMATIC POEM' WHICH IB CALLED TRAGEDY. Traoedy, as it was anciently composed, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other poems : therefore said by Aristotle to be of power, by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions; that is, to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirred up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated. Nor is Nature wanting in her own effects to make good his assertion ; for so, in physic, things of melancholy hue and quality are used against melancholy, sour against sour, salt to remove salt humours. Hence philosophers and other gravest writers, as Cicero, Plutarch, and others, frequently cite out of tragic poets, both to adorn and illustrate their discourse. The apostle Paul himself thought it not unworthy to insert a verse of Euripides into the text of Holy Scripture, 1 Cor. xv. 33; and Paraeus, commenting on the Revelation, divides the whole book as a tragedy, into acts distinguished each by chorus of heavenly harpings and song between. Heretofore men in highest dignity have laboured not a little to be thought able to compose a tragedy. Of that honour Dionysius the elder was no less ambitious, than before of his attaining to the tyranny. Augustus Caesar also had begun his Ajax, but, unable to please his own judgment with what he had begun, left it unfinished. Seneca, the philosopher, is by tome thought the author of those tragedies (at least the best of them) that go under that name. Gregory Nazianzen, a Father of the Church, thought it not unbeseeming the sanctity of hi...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217305464
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/11/2009
  • Pages: 222
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.47 (d)

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SAMSON AGONISTES. DRAMATIC POEM fragtcdia est imitatio actionis seriae, andc. per misericordiam et metum perficiens talium aiTectuum lustrationem. OF THAT SORT OF DRAMATIC POEM' WHICH IB CALLED TRAGEDY. Traoedy, as it was anciently composed, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other poems : therefore said by Aristotle to be of power, by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions; that is, to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirred up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated. Nor is Nature wanting in her own effects to make good his assertion ; for so, in physic, things of melancholy hue and quality are used against melancholy, sour against sour, salt to remove salt humours. Hence philosophers and other gravest writers, as Cicero, Plutarch, and others, frequently cite out of tragic poets, both to adorn and illustrate their discourse. The apostle Paul himself thought it not unworthy to insert a verse of Euripides into the text of Holy Scripture, 1 Cor. xv. 33; and Paraeus, commenting on the Revelation, divides the whole book as a tragedy, into acts distinguished each by chorus of heavenly harpings and song between. Heretofore men in highest dignity have laboured not a little to be thought able to compose a tragedy. Of that honour Dionysius the elder was no less ambitious, than before of his attaining to the tyranny. Augustus Caesar also had begun his Ajax, but, unable to please his own judgment with what he had begun, left it unfinished. Seneca, the philosopher, is by tome thought the author of those tragedies (at least the best of them) that go under that name.Gregory Nazianzen, a Father of the Church, thought it not unbeseeming the sanctity of hi...
Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2011

    Don't bother downloading.

    A very poor scan.

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