The Political Economy of Post-Soviet Russia

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Overview

This book deals with general political and economic developments that took place in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The major aim of this book is to analyze successes and failures of the Russian reform attempts, as well as their effect on the development of Russian regions, particularly from the point of view of interrelation between socio-economic tendencies and political developments. Analysis concentrates on both national dynamics and dynamics of development in three main groups of regions: ...

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2000 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. Excellent as new condition, a brand new copy. 274 p.; 1.14" x 8.89" x 5.91". *****PLEASE NOTE: This item is shipping from an authorized ... seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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Overview

This book deals with general political and economic developments that took place in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The major aim of this book is to analyze successes and failures of the Russian reform attempts, as well as their effect on the development of Russian regions, particularly from the point of view of interrelation between socio-economic tendencies and political developments. Analysis concentrates on both national dynamics and dynamics of development in three main groups of regions: mining, agricultural and manufacturing.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Tickomirov (U. of Melbourne) explores the economic, social, financial, and political tendencies that framed Russia's development from 1992 to 1998, and overviews successes and failures of reform attempts, the background and consequences of the collapse of the financial market in August 1998, the dynamics of capital flight, and development indicators in several spheres. Primarily he compares developments in the 89 administrative regions, but also examines voting patterns and political preferences. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312230869
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 8/28/2000
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 274
  • Product dimensions: 5.44 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 1.13 (d)

Meet the Author

Vladimir Tikhomirov is Deputy Director of the Contemporary Europe Research Centre at the University of Melbourne, Australia.

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Table of Contents

List of Tables
List of Graphs
List of Maps
Introduction 1
Ch. 1 Dynamics of Development in the Real Sector of Economy 13
1.1 Russian industry in the post-Soviet era 13
1.2 Crisis in agriculture 33
Ch. 2 State Finances, Banking Sector and Investment Flows 47
2.1 Federal budget, tax collection and dynamics of state borrowing in Russia 49
2.2 The emergence of private banking in Russia 69
2.3 Capital investment trends 80
2.4 Foreign investment in post-Soviet Russia 97
Ch. 3 The Russian Foreign Trade 115
3.1 Russian foreign trade with non-CIS countries 115
3.2 Russia's trade with the Commonwealth of Independent States 121
3.3 Regional patterns of foreign trade 127
3.4 Capital flight: ways and volumes 141
Ch. 4 Social Development and Income Distribution 167
4.1 Dynamics of population and employment growth 167
4.2 Current crisis in health services and in education 172
4.3 Changes in national and regional food consumption patterns 179
4.4 The widening gap between rich and poor 186
4.5 Shifts in occupational wages 194
4.6 Wage arrears and changes in regional per capita incomes 202
Ch. 5 The Evolution of Modern Russian Capitalism 225
5.1 Gaidar reforms (1991-92) 227
5.2 The confrontation (1993) 231
5.3 Chernomyrdin's stalemate (1994-95) 235
5.4 Presidential elections (1996) 242
5.5 The Chubais' reform (1997-98) 246
Ch. 6 The Dynamics of Political Change 270
6.1 Some general remarks on transition 271
6.2 The importance of social and economic reform 280
6.3 "Nomenklatura" revolution in Russia 287
6.4 Political fragmentation in post-Soviet Russia 292
6.5 The role of the presidency 297
6.6 Russian nationalism and the search for a national idea 309
Ch. 7 Conclusion 323
Bibliography 333
Index 348
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2001

    A Tragedy of Error

    This is a minute (though never tedious) chronology and phenomenology of the Reform Movement in Russia after communism. It is an exquisite obituary of the Russia that could have been and an indictment of the Russia that is and was. Dozens of detailed and thought provoking tables and graphs support observations that are never trite (though often familiar). It is a good tome of historiography. But it lacks a historiosophic element. It offers no exegesis, either explicit or implicit (through the ordering of events, for instance). In other words, it is not out to prove a thesis or a theory and it provides no paradigmatic platform. In the absence of these crucial elements of good history-writing - the book is reduced to the meticulous annals of the rise and fall of a dream. These shortcomings are somewhat ameliorated in Chapter 6 'The Dynamics of Political Change' where the author endeavours to present a coherent framework of trend analysis. Still, despite the profusion of economic content in the book, the author seems to me to be more at ease with matters political. Thus, the 'economy' in 'political economy' never enjoys the closure it deserves. The author does not approve of the hasty and insouciant manner in which shock therapy was applied to the already spasmodic body of Russia. He rightly observes that Russian 'capitalism' was the continuation of Soviet policy (he refrains from using the label 'communist') by other means. The features of authoritarianism, a privileged nomenklatura, an artificial economic model, the disillusionment and alienation of the electorate - all survived the proclaimed demise of communism. Capitalism simply replaced communism as a state religion. To these were added ills unknown under the Soviet yoke. Russia fragmented - regions against the centre. Impoverished by ever decreasing tax revenues, the state abandoned major industries to their dwindling fate. Private monopolies replaced state ones. The social safety net frayed and social cohesion vanished. According to Tikhomirov, the reformed Russia has nightmarishly mutated into a malignant form of its Soviet predecessor. Tikhomirov disputes the inevitability of such an outcome. While acknowledging the decrepitude and decomposition of the Soviet carcass - he would have advocated gradualism in putting it to rest. He rejects the notion that results are more important than the means employed to secure them. And he places the blame squarely on the reformists, who should have known better. As an example, he analyses the overnight abolition of price controls by the reformists and its disastrous effect on a monopoly-bound, competition-less economy. Still, many things are disregarded or glossed over. A Russian paranoid would probably have read a lot into these omissions. The all-pervasive, pernicious and deleterious criminality of Russia merits only a perfunctory mention in the book. Arguably, the annals of Russian crime post Soviet times would make an adequate history of Russia itself as well. To relegate it to the footnotes is a curious choice, to use an understatement. Another neglected factor is the foreign experts. Perhaps understandably so, as Mr. Tikhomirov is the Deputy Director of the Contemporary Europe Research Centre at the University of Melbourne. But these experts were always a part of the problem and never its solution. The more benign among their ranks regarded Russia as an experimental wonderland - the less scrupulous as an Eldorado. They colluded and obfuscated as much as any reformist has ever done. A third glaring oversight has to do with the motivation of the reformists. With very few exceptions, they were out to enrich themselves by all means fair and foul. The kin and kith of Chubais and the Chubais-like were as ruthless and iniquitous as any Russian gangster. A lot can be explained by attributing the worst intentions to this lot. The haste in privatizing state assets and lifting price controls afforded t

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