The Political Economy of the Egyptian Revolution: Mubarak, Economic Reforms and Failed Hegemony

The Political Economy of the Egyptian Revolution: Mubarak, Economic Reforms and Failed Hegemony

4.8 5
by R. Roccu
     
 

Focusing on the economic reforms adopted under Mubarak, Roberto Roccu provides the first account of the deeper socio-economic dynamics that made the 2011 Egyptian revolution possible.  See more details below

Overview

Focusing on the economic reforms adopted under Mubarak, Roberto Roccu provides the first account of the deeper socio-economic dynamics that made the 2011 Egyptian revolution possible.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"By looking at Gramsci through a sophisticated and less usual political economy lens, Roccu has written a brilliant and convincing reconstruction of the short-lived honeymoon between Egyptian elites and neoliberalism in the 2000s. This book offers a fresh perspective from which to understand some of the reasons behind Mubarak's fall in 2011 as well as some suggestions for reading the most recent events in Egypt." - Gennaro Gervasio, British University in Egypt

"This is a fluently written and convincing account of the ways in which neoliberalism plays itself out through the structures of the Egyptian state. Dr Roccu's confident and authoritative use of a Gramscian perspective to examine and explain the unraveling of Mubarak's political hegemony casts new light on the causes of the uprising of 2011. At the same time, it serves as a reminder of the lasting importance of Gramsci's thought. This is all the more necessary as the turmoil and violence of Egyptian politics continue to illuminate the troubled conditions of decayed hegemony." - Charles Tripp, SOAS, University of London, UK

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781137395917
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Publication date:
11/22/2013
Edition description:
2013
Pages:
139
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Roberto Roccu is Lecturer in International Political Economy at King's College London, UK. His research focuses on the political economy of reforms in the Middle East, and on how these reforms might have unintentionally contributed to the wave of popular uprisings in the region.

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