The Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War, 1850-1872 / Edition 1

The Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War, 1850-1872 / Edition 1

by Lyde Cullen Sizer

Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War, 1850-1872See more details below


Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War, 1850-1872

Product Details

The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
Civil War America Series
Edition description:
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.75(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: My Sphere Rounds Out: Northern Women and the Written War1
Ch. 1Rowing against Wind and Tide: How Women Wrote17
Wind and Tide: The Obstacles and Inspiration of Political Work22
Nine Rowers30
New England Mothers: Introducing Child, Stowe, and Fern32
Northern Borders: Introducing Southworth, Harper, and Davis37
New England Daughters: Introducing Hamilton, Alcott, and Phelps43
Ch. 2Raising a Voice: The Civil War Begins in the 1850s49
Stowe and Southworth: Slavery and the Proper Work of White Women52
Fern and Oakes: Independent versus Influential Womanhood57
Child versus Wise and Mason: Speaking for the North61
Jacobs and Davis: The Web of Racial and Wage Slavery66
Ch. 3What Can Woman Do?: The Rhetoric of Unity, 1861-186375
What Women Did77
Leave-Taking and Waiting: Early Stories of Patriotism84
A Woman-Centered Understanding of War: Delphine P. Baker and Metta V. Victor90
The Voice of Tribulation Periwinkle: Introducing Women-Nurses96
Political Work through Moral Suasion: Abolitionists Speak Out99
Ch. 4A Woman's Read: Crisis at Midwar109
Economic Struggle and Wartime Disillusionment114
To Upheave and Overturn: Gail Hamilton Goes to War121
Class Is Another War: Fern, Townsend, and Davis133
Ch. 5Trying to Find Places: The Question of African American Freedom in the Late War141
The Context143
Emancipation Rhetoric and Fanny Kemble's Journal: The War Turns a Corner144
He Is Every Where: Antislavery at Midwar147
A Shifting Subject: African American Men151
What Will We Do with the Negro? Wartime Strategies for Reconstruction158
Ch. 6Woman's Part of Glory: Love, Death, and Work in Women's Writing, 1863-1865167
Woman's Place in War: Women-Nurses169
Women on the Fictional Battlefront173
A Place for a Woman: Nurses Make Their Way181
A Crisis of Faith: An Internal Critique184
Ch. 7The Times Which Form History: Writing the War, 1865-1868193
Writing Women and the War: Transitions197
Women's Histories: Reinscribing the "Universal" Woman for Posterity200
Nursing Histories: Women's Authority and Class Conflict204
A Woman's War: Postwar Novels and Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth's: How He Won Her216
Ch. 8Still Waiting: Race and the Politics of Reconstruction223
Emphasizing Difference: Racial Whiteness in Postwar Fiction226
An Africanist Presence231
The Politics of Intermarriage234
Turning Points240
Ch. 9A New Emancipation: Interpreting the War for Tomorrow245
A Call for Women248
The "Coming Woman": Alcott and the Woman Question254
Woman As a Class: Phelps and the Labor Question263
The Threshold of a New Era: Harper and the Negro Question270

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