The Politics of Hong Kong's Reversion to China

Overview

When Britain's 99-year lease on Hong Kong expired on 1 July 1997, Hong Kong was reunited with China. To effect a successful transition. Britain and China negotiated for years, each claiming to pursue the best interests of Hong Kong, but each in reality pursuing its own advantage. However, the passionate Hong Kong response to the Tiananmen Square incident forced the British and the Chinese to realize that the people of Hong Kong would no longer passively accept what another ...
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Overview

When Britain's 99-year lease on Hong Kong expired on 1 July 1997, Hong Kong was reunited with China. To effect a successful transition. Britain and China negotiated for years, each claiming to pursue the best interests of Hong Kong, but each in reality pursuing its own advantage. However, the passionate Hong Kong response to the Tiananmen Square incident forced the British and the Chinese to realize that the people of Hong Kong would no longer passively accept what another country determined was best for it.

Thus, China faces a great challenge: to preserve the prosperity and stability that Hong Kong has achieved under the British legacy of a free-enterprise system and an efficient but non-interfering government. China proposes to link its own traditionally socialist economy and communist political system with Hong Kong under a 'one country-two systems' plan. Cultural and historical forces suggest that this marriage of opposites may well succeed.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780333684627
  • Publisher: Bow Historical Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/1998
  • Pages: 256

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Preface to the 1999 Reprint xix
Preface and Acknowledgments xxvii
List of Abbreviations xxxi
1 Introduction 1
The highlights in transition development 1
The pressure of time for conflict resolution 7
China's guiding principles in the Hong Kong experiment 10
Structure of the book 17
2 Joint Declarations on Hong Kong and Macao 19
Historical background 19
Chinese view on unequal treaties 20
Comparison of the two Joint Declarations 22
Process of the enactment of the Hong Kong Basic Law 27
3 The Stationing of Chinese Forces in Hong Kong 29
The Chinese military and politics 29
The Military's attitude toward Hong Kong 30
Stationing of People's Liberation Army Forces 31
Planning and training of the forces 35
Negotiation on military bases, facilities, and lands 37
The role of the People's Liberation Army in Hong Kong after 1997 39
4 Safe Haven, Visas, and Right of Abode 43
British nationality laws and Hong Kong 43
Problems of the various kinds of British citizenship 44
The British Government's response to the Hong Kong BDTCs 46
Other countries more generous 48
Britain's 'moral cowardice' 49
'Whole' insurance vs. 'home' insurance 51
Britain taking a giant step forward 52
British Dependent Territories citizens, British nationals (Overseas) and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passports 54
Foreign passports and right of abode in Hong Kong 55
Ethnic minorities and other problems 56
The bottom line: confidence 58
5 British Implementation of the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law 59
The necessity for deviation 60
The new British path of election reform and the transition implementation 76
6 Chinese Implementation of the Joint Declaration and the Basic Law 90
Deng's theory of 'one country, two systems' 92
China's reaction to Patten's reform and the 17 rounds of talk 98
Unilateral establishment of the 'second stove' 111
The preparatory committee and early 'second stove' implementation by the Hong Kong and Macao Office 115
The provisional legislature and its consultation 120
Politics of chief executive selection 125
Conclusion 127
7 Political Developments in Hong Kong 130
Introduction 130
Political Parties and Party Leaders 136
Political culture and political identity 146
The pro-Beijing groups and political development in Hong Kong 156
Sino-Hong Kong economic integration and political development in Hong Kong 160
8 The Court of Final Appeal (CFA) and Human Rights 166
Introduction 166
The Sino-British Agreement on the Court of Final Appeal 169
Governor Patten's struggle in the human rights debate 174
The Legislative Council and the Preparatory Working Committee struggle over human rights and localization of laws 177
Beijing's arguments on the Court of Final Appeal and the human rights debate 181
Public reactions to the Court of Final Appeal Agreement and the human rights debate 187
International interest in Hong Kong and its transition in 1997 191
9 Prospects for the Unification of China 201
Hong Kong's impact on China's unification 201
Taiwan's guidelines for unification 202
Could there be a timetable? 202
Why 1 January 2012? 203
Notes 205
Chronology 226
Appendix
The Sino-British Joint Declaration on Hong Kong 232
Introduction 232
Joint Declaration 239
Annex I to the Joint Declaration: Elaboration by the Government of the People's Republic of China of its Basic Policies regarding Hong Kong 242
Annex II to the Joint Declaration: Sino-British Joint Liaison Group 251
Annex III to the Joint Declaration: Land Leases 253
Exchange of Memoranda 254
Explanatory Notes 256
Index 266
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