The Politics of Latin Literature: Writing, Identity, and Empire in Ancient Rome [NOOK Book]

Overview

This is the first book to describe the intimate relationship between Latin literature and the politics of ancient Rome. Until now, most scholars have viewed classical Latin literature as a product of aesthetic concerns. Thomas Habinek shows, however, that literature was also a cultural practice that emerged from and intervened in the political and social struggles at the heart of the Roman world.

Habinek considers major works by such authors as Cato, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and ...

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The Politics of Latin Literature: Writing, Identity, and Empire in Ancient Rome

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Overview

This is the first book to describe the intimate relationship between Latin literature and the politics of ancient Rome. Until now, most scholars have viewed classical Latin literature as a product of aesthetic concerns. Thomas Habinek shows, however, that literature was also a cultural practice that emerged from and intervened in the political and social struggles at the heart of the Roman world.

Habinek considers major works by such authors as Cato, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Seneca. He shows that, from its beginnings in the late third century b.c. to its eclipse by Christian literature six hundred years later, classical literature served the evolving interests of Roman and, more particularly, aristocratic power. It fostered a prestige dialect, for example; it appropriated the cultural resources of dominated and colonized communities; and it helped to defuse potentially explosive challenges to prevailing values and authority. Literature also drew upon and enhanced other forms of social authority, such as patriarchy, religious ritual, cultural identity, and the aristocratic procedure of self-scrutiny, or existimatio.

Habinek's analysis of the relationship between language and power in classical Rome breaks from the long Romantic tradition of viewing Roman authors as world-weary figures, aloof from mundane political concerns--a view, he shows, that usually reflects how scholars have seen themselves. The Politics of Latin Literature will stimulate new interest in the historical context of Latin literature and help to integrate classical studies into ongoing debates about the sociology of writing.

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Editorial Reviews

Classical Review
The importance of this book, the reason why it should be required reading for anyone interested in Roman society and culture, lies not so much in the answers it offers as in the questions it provokes and the new lines of enquiry it suggests. . . . [It will] change the way we think about Latin literature.
— Neville Morley
Choice
A superb analysis. . . . These stimulating essays contribute to and complicate current debates about Latin literature.
Classical Review - Neville Morley
The importance of this book, the reason why it should be required reading for anyone interested in Roman society and culture, lies not so much in the answers it offers as in the questions it provokes and the new lines of enquiry it suggests. . . . [It will] change the way we think about Latin literature.
From the Publisher
One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 1998

"The importance of this book, the reason why it should be required reading for anyone interested in Roman society and culture, lies not so much in the answers it offers as in the questions it provokes and the new lines of enquiry it suggests. . . . [It will] change the way we think about Latin literature."—Neville Morley, Classical Review

"A superb analysis. . . . These stimulating essays contribute to and complicate current debates about Latin literature."—
Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781400822515
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 11/13/2001
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Course Book
  • Pages: 248
  • File size: 529 KB

Table of Contents



Acknowledgments


Introduction

3

Ch. 1

Latin Literature and the Problem of Rome

15

Ch. 2

Why Was Latin Literature Invented?

34

Ch. 3

Cicero and the Bandits

69

Ch. 4

Culture Wars in the First Century B.C.E.

88

Ch. 5

Writing as Social Performance

103

Ch. 6

Roman Women's Useless Knowledge

122

Ch. 7

An Aristocracy of Virtue

137

Ch. 8

Pannonia Domanda Est: The Construction of the Imperial Subject through Ovid's Poetry from Exile

151



Notes

171



Index of Passages Cited

223



General Index

229

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