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The Politics of Parental Leave Policies: Children, Parenting, Gender and the Labour Market

Overview


With the growth of parental employment, leave policy is at the centre of welfare state development and at the heart of countries' child and family policies. It is widely recognised as an essential element for attaining important demographic, social and economic goals and is the point where many different policy areas intersect: child well-being, family, gender equality, employment and labour markets, and demography. Leave policy, therefore, gives a unique insight into a country's values, interests and ...
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Overview


With the growth of parental employment, leave policy is at the centre of welfare state development and at the heart of countries' child and family policies. It is widely recognised as an essential element for attaining important demographic, social and economic goals and is the point where many different policy areas intersect: child well-being, family, gender equality, employment and labour markets, and demography. Leave policy, therefore, gives a unique insight into a country's values, interests and priorities. International comparisons of leave policy are widely available, but far less attention has been paid to understanding the factors that bring about these variations. "The politics of parental leave policies" makes good this omission. Looking at parental leave policy within a wider work/family context, it addresses how and why, and by whom, particular policies are created and subsequently developed in particular countries. Chapters covering 15 countries in Europe and beyond and the European Union bring together leading academic experts to provide a unique insight into the past, present and future state of this key policy area. "The politics of parental leave policies" is essential reading for students, teachers and researchers in social policy, child and family policy, welfare states, gender relations and equality, and employment and labour markets, providing an opportunity to study in depth the creation of social policy. It will also be of interest to policy makers in national governments and international organisations.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Parental leave policy is on the agenda in many countries today. While the variation across countries has been well documented, this timely book fills an important gap by exploring the reasons behind that variation. Jane Waldfogel, Columbia University School of Social Work

Thought-provoking indeed. Katrina Allen in Children and Society

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847429032
  • Publisher: Policy Press at the Univ of Bristol
  • Publication date: 1/19/2011
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


Sheila Kamerman, Director, Institute for Child and Family Policy, Columbia University and Peter Moss, Thomas Coram Research Unit, University of London
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Table of Contents


List of tables and figures
Acknowledgements
Notes on contributors

1. Introduction
      Peter Moss and Sheila B. Kamerman
2. Australia: the difficult birth of paid maternity leave
      Deborah Brennan
3. Canada and Québec: two policies, one country
      Andrea Doucet, Lindsey McKay and Diane-Gabrielle Trembly
4. Czech Republic: normative or choice-oriented system?
      Jiřina Kocourková
5. Estonia: halfway from the Soviet Union to the Nordic countries
      Marre Karu and Katre Pall
6. Finland: negotiating tripartite compromises
      Johanna Lammi-Taskula and Pentti Takala
7. France: gender equality a pipe dream?
      Jeanne Fagnani and Antoine Math
8. Germany: taking a Nordic turn?
      Daniel Erler
9. Hungary and Slovenia: long leave or short?
      Marta Korintus and Nada Stropnik
10. Iceland: from reluctance to fast-track engineering
      Thorgerdur Einarsdóttir and Gyda Margrét Pétursdóttir
11. The Netherlands: bridging labour and care
      Janneke Plantenga and Chantal Remery
12. Norway: the making of the father’s quota
      Berit Brandth and Elin Kvande
13. Portugal and Spain: two pathways in Southern Europe
      Karin Wall and Anna Escobedo
14. Sweden: individualisation or free choice in parental leave?
      Anders Chronholm
15. The European directive: making supra-national parental leave policy
      Bernard Fusulier
16. Conclusion
      Sheila B. Kamerman and Peter Moss

Appendix
Index

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