The Politics of Poverty: Planning India's Development

The Politics of Poverty: Planning India's Development

by D K Rangnekar
     
 

Dr D. K. Rangnekar was a leading public intellectual who marked his presence as the editor of the Economic Times and later the Business Standard. This collection brings together a discerning selection of his writings that are organized across four themes: social and political dimensions of development; international context to India’s

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Overview

Dr D. K. Rangnekar was a leading public intellectual who marked his presence as the editor of the Economic Times and later the Business Standard. This collection brings together a discerning selection of his writings that are organized across four themes: social and political dimensions of development; international context to India’s experiment; planning and budgets; and industrial and economic policy. The writings begin in the early 1960s and end in 1984—at the cusp of radical transformation of India’s economic policies and political fabric—thus providing an important handbook of the times.

The collection includes reflections on PL480 and the accompanying devaluation; the 1970s call for a New International Economic Order and the problems of development in an unequal world; and G77 solidarity and the Uruguay Round of negotiations of GATT. Drawing on Dr Rangnekar’s expertise in planning, budgets, and black money, the collection includes his commentaries on the transition from Nehruism and planned development to the difficult foundations of India’s contemporary economic performance.

The selection is accompanied by essays from T.N. Ninan, Pratap Bhanu Mehta and Sanjaya Baru.

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Editorial Reviews

Frontline
An easy read on the crucial economic and political issues of the first three and a half decades after Independence. Rangnekar’s writings communicate the feelings of one for whom these were of more than professional interest: he had a passionate personal involvement in national issues…. Recommend the volume to those who are searching for explanations for the paradoxes of our time.

Business India
[The book] gives the reader a rare insight into the man he [Ranganekar] was, with essays by T.N. Ninan, Pratap Bhanu Mehta and Sanjay Baru...Rangnekar’s balanced perspective, long-term vision and discourse on issues that are as alive today as they were then, make the essays in the book a must read.
Businessworld
[A] lucid, in-your-face analysis of the economy…full of strong comments and prophetic inferences. Rangnekar wrote for the layman, and that explains the simplicity of his arguments. He made economics, often called the dismal science; cheerful and refreshing….There is an interesting foreword by T.N. Ninan, and an equally fascinating introduction by Pratap Bhanu Mehta. Neatly edited and indexed, the book succeeds in unravelling the genius of D N Rangnekar. It should be read by everyone interested in Indian economy, especially business journalists.

Business Standard
A delight for a researcher who gets in one place all thought processes and critiques on issues that were held sacrosanct for around three decades.... on the whole, the book is likely to appeal more to those who have lived through both the pre and post- reform eras, when we swung from mixed to an open economic system...but when he talks of public poliy, poverty and inequality, it rings a bell even today. In that sense, this book is timely and helps evoke introspection.
Business World
Neatly edited and indexed, the book succeeds in unravelling the genius of D.N. Ranganekar. It should be read by everyone interested in Indian economy, especially business journalists.
31 May 2013 Frontline
An easy read on crucial economic and political issues for the first three and a half decades after independence...the volume is for those who are searching for explanations for the paradoxes of our time.

The Tribune
An elaborate study at the country’s economy by dwelling upon issues both at the micro and macro level...a candid attempt to address the cause of the common man.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788132109020
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publication date:
10/18/2012
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

D. K. Rangnekar (1931–84), an economist, author and futurologist, was a student of the Bombay University later proceeding to Cambridge University for his Tripos and then the London School of Economics for his Ph D in Economics as a Tata Fellow. Though trained as an economist, he soon moved into journalism with an initial stint at Ceylon Daily News in Colombo and later in 1963 as Resident Editor of The Economic Times. He swiftly took over as the Editor of the paper and steered it till January 1979. He then proceeded to be the Editor of Business Standard till his early demise in 1984. While most of his writings are in these two economic dailies, he did write widely. This includes magazines and journals like Seminar, Economic and Political Weekly, Mainstream and the Illustrated Weekly of India and international magazines, like Time. Separately he also authored a couple of books, such as Poverty and Capital Development in India (Royal Institute of International Affairs), India Britain and ECM and pamphlets, such as Bokaro: A Story of Bungling (self-published, 1963).

In his time he served on a number of government-appointed committees like the National Council for Science and Technology’s Futurology Panel and the Export Strategy Committee (the Tandon Committee), among others. Not bound by doctrinaire ideology or party-politics, his contributions to these committees were known for their critical independence, which in some instances took the form of a ‘Note of Dissent’. His prescient observations can be gauged by the fact that it was in the 1970s and early 1980s that he wrote about India’s need to de-license to create competitiveness and to exploit the opportunities of a knowledge economy hub, in addition to a number of other relevant observations.

His scholarship and leadership on such issues led to wider recognition, including a nomination amongst Time magazines’ 500 global leaders in the late 1970s. His broad spectrum of interests and activities also included films (he actively participated in the National Film Development Corporation) and music (he was an early member of the first Jazz Yatra). Preoccupation and interests like these, among others, led to his unique stamp on the shape and coverage of the two economic dailies he edited where cultural and political issues got adequate space.

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