The Politics of Women's Work: The Paris Garment Trades, 1750-1915

Overview

Few issues attracted more attention in the nineteenth century than the "problem" of women's work, and few industries posed that problem more urgently than the booming garment industry in Paris. The seamstress represented the quintessential "working girl," and the sewing machine became the icon of "modern" femininity. The intense speculation and worry that swirled around both helped define many issues of gender and labor that concern us today. In this wide-ranging history of the Parisian garment industry, from the...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $34.00   
  • New (5) from $34.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

Few issues attracted more attention in the nineteenth century than the "problem" of women's work, and few industries posed that problem more urgently than the booming garment industry in Paris. The seamstress represented the quintessential "working girl," and the sewing machine became the icon of "modern" femininity. The intense speculation and worry that swirled around both helped define many issues of gender and labor that concern us today. In this wide-ranging history of the Parisian garment industry, from the unraveling of the guilds in the late 1700s to the first minimum wage bill in 1915, Judith Coffin explores how issues related to working women took shape. What constituted "women's" work? Did women belong in the industrial labor force? Why was women's work equated with low pay? Should not a woman enjoy status as an enlightened homemaker/consumer? In this fascinating combination of the social history of women's labor and the intellectual history of nineteenth-century social science and political economy, Coffin sets many such questions in their fullest cultural context. She examines the century-long historical processes that made gender fundamental to the modern social division of labor and our understanding of it.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691605111
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/14/2014
  • Series: Princeton Legacy Library Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction 3
Ch. 1 Women's Work? Men and Women, Guild and Clandestine Production in Eighteenth-Century Paris 19
Ch. 2 Machinery, Political Economy, and Women's Work, 1830-1870 46
Ch. 3 Selling the Sewing Machine: Credit, Advertising, and Republican Modernity, 1870-1900 74
Ch. 4 The Revival of Homework: Many Routes to Mass Production 121
Ch. 5 Married Women's Work: Wage Earning, Domesticity, and Work Identity 141
Ch. 6 Unions and the Politics of Production 175
Ch. 7 Social Science and the Politics of Consumption 201
Ch. 8 The Minimum Wage Bill: Work, Wages, and Worth 229
Conclusion 251
Bibliography 259
Index 275
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)