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The Porticello Shipwreck: A Mediterranean Merchant Vessel of 415-385 B. C
     

The Porticello Shipwreck: A Mediterranean Merchant Vessel of 415-385 B. C

by Cynthia Jones Eiseman
 

The Porticello Shipwreck provides unique information on seafaring technologies and trade practices at the turn of the fifth century B.C.

This volume is the final report of the excavation, including detailed analyses of the ship and its contents and a thorough catalog of artifacts associated with the shipwreck. The Porticello wreck documents for the Classical

Overview

The Porticello Shipwreck provides unique information on seafaring technologies and trade practices at the turn of the fifth century B.C.

This volume is the final report of the excavation, including detailed analyses of the ship and its contents and a thorough catalog of artifacts associated with the shipwreck. The Porticello wreck documents for the Classical period aspects of anchor, sail, and hull construction. The cargo provides the earliest evidence for maritime trade in ink and the export of Athenian lead to the Mediterranean, and the cargo of amphoras is the largest assemblage of Greek and Punic amphoras from a shipwreck site.

Of particular importance are the fragments of bronze Greek sculpture of the Classical period, which include a strikingly realistic bearded head. These pieces strongly suggest that techniques of Classical Greek bronze casting were much more varied and complex than art historians previously has though possible.

The information in this book will be of great value to students of Classical Greek archaeology, sculpture, and economics as well as those interested in ancient maritime history. 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781603445221
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press
Publication date:
11/26/2012
Series:
Ed Rachal Foundation Nautical Archaeology Series , #2
Pages:
138
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.30(d)

Meet the Author

Cynthia Jones Eiseman is retired from two careers, classical archaeology and charitable fundraising. She is currently writing a book about Society Hill, Philadelphia. She has lived there since 1972.

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