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The Post-Presidency from Washington to Clinton

Overview

When George Washington decided not to seek a third term, he initiated what would be a longstanding concern and challenge for former presidents: what to do with their post-presidential lives. The retirement of James Madison in 1817 initiated active ex-presidencies as he was drawn into political controversies; since then, the post-presidency has become an office unto itself.

Burton Kaufman's unique history of that "office" traces the evolving roles of former presidents from ...

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Overview

When George Washington decided not to seek a third term, he initiated what would be a longstanding concern and challenge for former presidents: what to do with their post-presidential lives. The retirement of James Madison in 1817 initiated active ex-presidencies as he was drawn into political controversies; since then, the post-presidency has become an office unto itself.

Burton Kaufman's unique history of that "office" traces the evolving roles of former presidents from Washington to Clinton, examining the lives of the thirty-one who lived for at least two years after leaving office. He marks the transition of the ex-presidency from the 18th-century republican ideal-that of politically disinterested private citizens engaging briefly in public service before returning to private life-to one in which former presidents became increasingly active.

Beginning with John Quincy Adams's post-presidential election to Congress, former presidents no longer maintained the pretense of abstaining from active participation in the nation's political affairs. Today the bar has been set by Jimmy Carter, whom historians have regarded as a middling president but who may well have established a new paradigm for ex-presidents. Kaufman also reveals how the post-presidency has evolved since World War II into a big business, with ex-presidents raking in millions of dollars through book sales, lectures, and corporate employment.

Drawing extensively on primary sources, including presidential papers, Kaufman maintains that this evolution has followed a path similar to that of the presidency itself. He shows that most have had fascinating post-presidential careers filled with both accomplishment and failure, and that in some cases their lives after leaving office were as important historically as their careers as president and give new insights into their personalities.

Kaufman's study offers an absorbing look at how and why changes in the post-presidency have occurred over the two centuries that will fascinate any aficionado of American history. More than thirty photos—from Harry Truman taking his daily constitutional to Richard Nixon rehabilitating his reputation—grace the text.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This helpful book thoroughly examines the role of the ex-president in American life and politics by focusing on the 31 presidents who lived for at least two years after leaving office. Kaufman (The Presidency of James Earl Carter, Jr.) succeeds in his stated goal of presenting a comprehensive history of the post-presidency. His book supplants Marie Hecht's Beyond the Presidency as the most thorough study of the topic. The author traces the evolution of the ex-president from debt-ridden private citizens (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant) to the high-paid speakers and elder statesmen with whom we are familiar today. While much about the post-presidency has changed, the similarities noted here are striking. Whether through behind-the-scenes correspondence or published memoirs, nearly every former president has labored to preserve his legacy. VERDICT Kaufman provides enough context to make this work accessible to nonspecialists. While not intended as a reference work, it functions admirably as one, with each well-documented sketch serving as an excellent starting point for further research. Recommended for readers interested in American political history or the ex-presidents.—Nicholas Graham, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lib.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780700618613
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas
  • Publication date: 10/1/2012
  • Pages: 662
  • Sales rank: 1,435,366
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 2.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Burton I. Kaufman is former Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, chair of the history department and director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies at Virginia Tech, and most recently an adjunct professor of history at the University of Utah prior to his retirement. He is author of twelve books, including (with Scott Kaufman) The Presidency of James Earl Carter, Jr. and Presidential Profiles: The Carter Years.

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Table of Contents

Preface ix

Acknowledgments xiii

1 The Republican Ideal of the Post-Presidency: Washington, Adams, and Jefferson 1

2 From the Republican to the Democratic Ideal of the Post-Presidency: Madison, Monroe, and Quincy Adams 36

3 Former Presidents as Partisan Politicians: Jackson, Van Buren, and Tyler 70

4 Doughface Former Presidents: Fillmore, Pierce, and Buchanan 102

5 Former Presidents in an Age of Transition: Johnson and Grant 132

6 Former Presidents and the Emergent Modern Presidency: Hayes, Cleveland I, and Harrison 162

7 The Post-Presidency and the Modern Presidency: Cleveland U and Roosevelt 196

8 Former Presidents as Symbols of an Era: Taft, Wilson, and Coolidge 242

9 The Modern Post-Presidency: Hoover 289

10 The Office of Ex-President: Truman 316

11 The Limits of the Office of Ex-President: Eisenhower and Johnson 352

12 The Mass Marketing of the Post-Presidency: Nixon and Ford 395

13 Citizen/Politician of the World: Carter, Reagan 446

Epilogue: Bush and Clinton 486

Notes 525

Bibliographic Essay 607

Index 619

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