The Prairie Winnows Out Its Own: The West River Country of South Dakota in the Years of Depression and Dust

The Prairie Winnows Out Its Own: The West River Country of South Dakota in the Years of Depression and Dust

by Paula M Nelson
     
 

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Paula Nelson has done it again. Previously she described the boom and bust of the American West's last frontier, South Dakota's west river country, in her award-winning After the West Was Won. The west river country is again the place, and the 1920s and 1930s are the time, for her new social history sequel. Seldom are the Plains chronicled with such passion and precision."—John R. Wunder, Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"Nelson's story, which is told largely through the west river settlers' own words, reveals a bond between people and the land so strong that only the most overwhelming adversity could finally break it. It is a fascinating tale of hopes raised and dreams shattered within a single generation. One cannot help being moved. The book should be required reading for all who seek to understand human persistence in a zone that outsiders have been too willing to dismiss as submarginal."—John C. Hudson, Northwestern University

"Highly readable. . . . The term 'wide open spaces' takes on new meaning in Nelson's book. . . . A marvelous job of presenting the lives of west river South Dakotans during times of extreme stress in a way that should touch all readers' emotions regardless of where they live."—Dorothy Schwieder, Iowa State University

Booknews
Nelson (history, U. of Wisconsin-Platteville) provides a fascinating economic and social history of South Dakota's west river country, beginning with the collapse of the agricultural economy in the early 1920s, through the 1930s, largely told through the settlers' own words. A few b&w photographs. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780877459309
Publisher:
University of Iowa Press
Publication date:
02/15/2005
Edition description:
1
Pages:
276
Sales rank:
1,248,208
Product dimensions:
5.63(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are saying about this

Dorothy Schwieder
Highly readable. . . . The term 'wide open spaces' takes on new meaning in Nelson's book. . . . A marvelous job of presenting the lives of west river South Dakotans during times of extreme stress in a way that should touch all readers' emotions regardless of where they live.
John C. Hudson
Nelson's story, which is told largely through the west river settlers' own words, reveals a bond between people and the land so strong that only the most overwhelming adversity could finally break it. It is a fascinating tale of hopes raised and dreams shattered within a single generation. One cannot help being moved. The book should be required reading for all who seek to understand human persistence in a zone that outsiders have been too willing to dismiss as submarginal.
John R. Wunder
Paula Nelson has done it again. Previously she described the boom and bust of the American West's last frontier, South Dakota's west river country, in her award-winning After the West Was Won. The west river country is again the place, and the 1920s and 1930s are the time, for her new social history sequel. Seldom are the Plains chronicled with such passion and precision.

Meet the Author

Paula Nelson is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville.

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