The Presidency in a Separated System

The Presidency in a Separated System

by Charles O. Jones
     
 

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Challenging the facile portrayal of the US government as centered on the president, Jones (emeritus political science, U. of Wisconsin) examines the organizational, political, and procedural constraints on the chief executive, as well as the role of public approval. In the second edition, he refines his concepts, and updates his examples through Clinton and George W.

Overview

Challenging the facile portrayal of the US government as centered on the president, Jones (emeritus political science, U. of Wisconsin) examines the organizational, political, and procedural constraints on the chief executive, as well as the role of public approval. In the second edition, he refines his concepts, and updates his examples through Clinton and George W. Bush. No date is mentioned for the first. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Through detailed examinations of ten post-war administrations and their relationship with Congress, Jones (political science, U. of Wisconsin) shows that despite the headlines and public visibility that presidents command, all find their power to govern restrained by party politics, divided government, special interests, media scrutiny, and especially by the constitutional prerogatives of the legislative branch. Paper edition (unseen), $16.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher

"All students of American politics, not just presidential scholars, will want to read what Jones has written." — American Political Science Review

"Jones has effectively and authoritatively replaces a popular view of the American presidency with a more accurate one. His arguments and his evidence will enlarge and enrich our thinking about the office." —Richard F Fenno., Jr., University of Rochester

"One of the most important books on American government to have appeared for a generation. traditionally, the relations between the presidency and Congress have been portrayed as confrontational, with the presidency assumed to be responsible for taking most important policy initiatives. Jones shows that this view is mistaken —that Congress typically has its own agenda, its own capacity for taking initiatives, and its own policy momentum. In years to come, students of American politics will refer to 'Jones' as they now refer to 'Neustadt.'" —Anthony King, University of Essex

"Jones powerfully elaborates the point that ours is not a 'presidential system,' but instead a system of separated institutions deliberately mixed up in one another's dings. For action and reform alike, that is the beginning of wisdom, and there Jones begins. I hope it is widely read, especially by all who now purport to use the system, or to change it. The country would gain in they all understood it. Jones does." —Richard E. Neustadt, Harvard University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815797777
Publisher:
Brookings Institution Press
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
358
Sales rank:
1,014,353
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Charles O. Jones is a nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, the Hawkins Professor of Political Science (emeritus) at the University of Wisconsin, and a former president of the American Political Science Association. His books include Clinton and Congress, 1993-96 (University of Oklahoma Press, 1999) and Passages to the Presidency (Brookings, 1998).

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