The Pretty Dead

The Pretty Dead

5.0 1
by David Martin Stack
     
 
A mysterious virus threatens to turn the world into mindless zombies. The infected exhibit early symptoms of extreme conformity. When the virus outbreak hits a small Catholic high school in Kentucky, naturally nobody notices. Blake and his twin sister M. have a tragic sixteenth birthday when their father disappears, accused of embezzling millions to cover gambling

Overview

A mysterious virus threatens to turn the world into mindless zombies. The infected exhibit early symptoms of extreme conformity. When the virus outbreak hits a small Catholic high school in Kentucky, naturally nobody notices. Blake and his twin sister M. have a tragic sixteenth birthday when their father disappears, accused of embezzling millions to cover gambling debts. In the months after, the twins struggle to deal with the ordinary evils of high school - like cliques, detention, and driver's exams - while an extraordinary evil gathers around them. It turns out it's not just their imaginations - the cool kids really are trying to destroy them. Not to mention Blake's feelings for his ex-girlfriend - which he thought had long since died and were buried - are coming back big time. Now, pursued by infected teachers and classmates, and a goth band who want to force a deadly battle of the bands, the twins must expose a deadly conspiracy hell-bent on taking over the world.

Editorial Reviews

Amanda Ashby
"High Fidelity meets Shaun of the Dead! The Pretty Dead has what every good book should have: snappy dialogue, rock and roll attitude, and, of course, zombies! But be warned, once you start reading you won't want to put it down!" - Amanda Ashby, author of Zombie Queen of Newbury High and Fairy Bad Day

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780983223474
Publisher:
Currency Media Group
Publication date:
08/01/2011
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
0.60(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

David Martin Stack has written many books for children, including picture books for Small Change Press and teen non-fiction for Scholastic Education. New York Magazine called his indie-rock picture book Good Morning Captain the "world's most terrifying children's book." David grew up in Louisville, KY. He studied poetry and film in New Hampshire at the alma mater of Dr. Seuss and Captain Kangaroo. His bands The Shively and Pedicabo were so underground you never heard of them. David lives in Brooklyn with his wife, his son and daughter, and his crazy dog.

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The Pretty Dead 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. The chapter titles likely make an awesome soundtrack, based on the songs and bands I'm familiar with. The Posterband website, which features a DJ Dead Air jukebox, has many fine songs on it to listen to, possibly while reading the book. The firm roots of its Louisville setting create a searchable world, complete with the fabulous old Mizzoni's where I too enjoyed rolled oyster sandwiches as a child with my family. Some of these places are no longer around, which is sad. Ear X-Tacy recently went out of business, but before doing so, they helped him promote the book, which was really nice. I like how it seems that certain things are happening, but they end up being a trick near the beginning; this really worked to build suspense. When it turns out certain things did happen, I felt just as surprised and maybe appropriately confused as the characters. The downfall of this book, which I hope is corrected for further editions or simply just entries in this series, is the grammar. I have seen many dropped words, extra commas, and mistyped words ("lighting" instead of "light," although I'm not sure if that particular error was made). With careful editing, this mistake would be easy to avoid, and readers may be more pleased. All in all, this was a really good read. When my daughter is a bit older, I will definitely let her read it; right now it's just a matter of her being responsible with the book more than any issues I might have with the profanity. In today's culture, I don't think it's beyond the realm of appropriateness for teen reads to have profanity as long as the readers are mature. I'm really looking forward to future entries in the series. Something super-interesting is that I actually met the author in August at the Kentucky State Fair where he was promoting the book. I hadn't heard of the book before, but the battle of the bands and the zombie dance troupe was really great. Mr. Stack is very personable and accommodating. He was kind to my family and signed and dedicated a copy of the book to us. He told me about the Zombie Walk, which I had heard about but wasn't familiar with, which was right around the corner; we went and had a blast.