The Prince Child

( 1 )

Overview

When the prince child is born, all of the animals of the forest must decide what gifts they will bring to him.  The heron brings a song, the snow cat brings a crystal ball, and the gerbil brings flowers. How are they to know what the prince wants most of all?

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Overview

When the prince child is born, all of the animals of the forest must decide what gifts they will bring to him.  The heron brings a song, the snow cat brings a crystal ball, and the gerbil brings flowers. How are they to know what the prince wants most of all?

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Publisher's Weekly (01/10/2005):

"In this team's gently wry debut, a series of eerily realistic animal portraits illustrate one-page profiles that tell what each character will bring to a party for the Prince. Like aboriginals at a secret dance, van der Linden's animals adorn themselves for the gathering with cowrie shells, tusk-like teeth, daubed-on paint and feathers … Even children who've seen dozens of animal photographs will pause to look at these - the hyena, for instance, waits and watches with a face tattooed Maori-style; he sports a fantastic basket-woven hat from which strings of beads dangle. In each of Rinck's short vignettes (which appear on the left, with the full-bleed portraits on the right), animals uncertain of the worth of their gifts receive tender encouragement, while over-confident animals get gentle rebukes … In a quiet moment of fairy-tale parody, the Prince turns out to be a tiny frog ("Has anyone brought what the prince wants most? Has anyone brought him a kiss?"). This creation is itself a marvelous gift to bring to any party."
   

Publishers Weekly
In this team's gently wry debut, a series of eerily realistic animal portraits illustrate one-page profiles that tell what each character will bring to a party for the Prince. Like aboriginals at a secret dance, van der Linden's animals adorn themselves for the gathering with cowrie shells, tusk-like teeth, daubed-on paint and feathers. Painted, apparently, from inches away, the animals-despite their fantastic accessories-look real enough to touch. Van der Linden seems to delight in depicting their eyes particularly; his portraits linger on their glitter and moistness. Even children who've seen dozens of animal photographs will pause to look at these-the hyena, for instance, waits and watches with a face tattooed Maori-style; he sports a fantastic basket-woven hat from which strings of beads dangle. In each of Rinck's short vignettes (which appear on the left, with the full-bleed portraits on the right), animals uncertain of the worth of their gifts receive tender encouragement, while over-confident animals get gentle rebukes. In "The Gerbil," flowers that have refused to be picked by other creatures, give themselves to the humble rodent when he asks, "Dear flowers,... may I bring you to the party?" In a quiet moment of fairy-tale parody, the Prince turns out to be a tiny frog ("Has anyone brought what the prince wants most? Has anyone brought him a kiss?"). This creation is itself a marvelous gift to bring to any party. Ages 2-6. (Nov.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Vivid, full-page color illustrations of animals preparing to attend a party are the highlight of this book. Their liquid eyes seem to stare out from the page. The heron, snow cat, lizard, beaver, and others adorned in their finest shells, beads, and feathers select gifts. The crane will present a book; the marten, poetry; the hyena, an amulet. Each page contains a prose description of the animal, his thoughts, and anticipation. The reader wonders whose party it is? Who is the young prince? That question is not answered until the last page. Reader anticipation is built on the individual stories of the animals, and the final section, "The Young Prince," may disappoint. It leaves some questions unanswered. Has anyone brought what the prince wants most? Will the prince's wish be granted? It is likely that readers will enjoy the illustrations more than the story, which is a nice collection of verses about animals, but lacks an engaging plot. 2004, Front Street/Lemniscaat, Ages 4 to 8.
—Mary Loftus
Kirkus Reviews
Rich paintings tell the thoughtful tale of animals preparing for the prince's party. On each clean, white, left-hand page is text about an animal musing on a present for the prince; on the right is a detailed, elegant, full-page portrait of that animal in costume, anticipating the party. The gerbil brings "flowers, the color of the sun"; the heron brings a song; the snow cat brings a little crystal ball. The lizard worries about whether his speeding-ahead friend has their gift, but she assures him she does and that they'll present it together. The animals' costumes evoke world-wide indigenous cultures. The young prince, appearing finally on the last page, is (surprisingly) a tiny, delicate frog sitting on a lily pad wearing a minuscule gold crown. His wish for a certain particular gift implies a gentle link with a famous fairy tale, but knowledge of that tale isn't necessary for enjoyment of this lovely piece. (Picture book. 3-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932425154
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2004
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 1 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.92 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Maranke Rinck studied music and dance in secondary school. She graduated in interactive skills and now teaches people who are going to be teachers. She also writes stories. The Prince Child is her first picture book story.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2005

    Outstanding? Indeed!

    I am 32, not a child anymore. The Prince Child was given to me as a present. My friend said to me: 'Gary, you could use something beautiful, so I give you this book. Enjoy.' At first I wondered, why would someone give a picture book to an adult who has no kids? But then I turned the first page and I started reading the lyrical story and looking at the mysterious paintings of animals. I love the book. I pick it up now and then, read a little, discover new things in the paintings... It is a wonderfull and beautiful world the authors created, really!

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