The Prince

The Prince

3.9 105
by Nicolo MacHiavelli, Ninian Thomson, W. Marriott
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Machiavelli cut his political teeth during the Renaissance, a time of intense hatred between Italian city states. His book, thought cynical and pessimistic by later generations, struck his contemporaries as eminently sane.

Machiavelli was a man of action, a patriot, devout. He wrote THE PRINCE to describe how a leader could unite Italy and put a stop to the

Overview

Machiavelli cut his political teeth during the Renaissance, a time of intense hatred between Italian city states. His book, thought cynical and pessimistic by later generations, struck his contemporaries as eminently sane.

Machiavelli was a man of action, a patriot, devout. He wrote THE PRINCE to describe how a leader could unite Italy and put a stop to the senseless conflict.

"He wrote of people only as he found them. He started from the principle that human nature does not change, and argued for a political system based on man as he is, not as he should be."

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A superb translation; with an excellent, sensible introduction."—Michael Altschul, Case Western Reserve University

"Bondanella's 'Introduction' is excellent; also, the fine translation offers much for the humanity student."—Darlene J. Alberts, Ohio Dominican College

"Every leader in the third world should read this and be advised by it."—Godwin C. Duru, Ohio Dominican College

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781456514822
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
01/15/2011
Pages:
126
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.27(d)

Meet the Author

Niccolò Machiavelli was born at Florence on 3rd May 1469. His life falls into three periods, each of which singularly enough constitutes a distinct and important era in the history of Florence. His youth was concurrent with the greatness of Florence as an Italian power under the guidance of Lorenzo de' Medici, Il Magnifico. The downfall of the Medici in Florence occurred in 1494, in which year Machiavelli entered the public service. During his official career Florence was free under the government of a Republic, which lasted until 1512, when the Medici returned to power, and Machiavelli lost his office. The Medici again ruled Florence from 1512 until 1527, when they were once more driven out. This was the period of Machiavelli's literary activity and increasing influence; but he died, within a few weeks of the expulsion of the Medici, on 22nd June 1527, in his fifty-eighth year, without having regained office.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Prince 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 105 reviews.
stitchworthy More than 1 year ago
Had to read this book for school. Not my favorite book, but should you wish to read the classic, this is definitely the best FREE version out there.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AP World History Review This Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli is not as it is believed to be by some people. It's not heartless, and the opposite way to rule a government. He has a clear way of stating how a ruler should rule. It's about keeping unity among citizens, and using power, without abusing it. I would recommend this book because it has a way of making you look at government differently. It is also a great way of learning how people thought on military tactics for that time period, which were important for that time period. I like how Machiavelli was quick to make his point; he wasn’t wasting any time making his points. Since there wasn’t a lot of extra writing to decipher. it helped to understand what he was writing. Since the points came straight out, it made the book shorter, which was a nice size for a book on politics. The book was still a little tough at first, but as I read it got easier, it helped that I read Introducing Machiavelli by Patrick Curry and Oscar Zarate. Even if you aren’t a history buff, this book may take time to read, but it is worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Machiavelli has a bad reputation but this is because people judge him by this work alone. This is because he was not wtiting about the way things should be but the way things were/are. For another view of a differing side of his thinking read his "Discourses on Livy". The Prince is a book that should be read by everyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Prince is not the heartless manual on backstabbing it is often portrayed as being. Rather Machiavelli seems most interested in issuing a wake up call to Italian leaders to get better at their jobs so as to protect Italy from becoming the plaything of foreign powers. It is interesting to note that Jefferson could read the Prince and extract not a lesson of ruthlessness, but rather the idea that a republic founded on popular support was safer and more durable than one based on the ambitions of a few selfish nobles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The truth is I thought that this book was surprisingly not as chilling as some have made it out to be, for example, I realize that when invading befriending the weak to take down the ruler but keeping those weak powers weak is by no means a nice thing to do. But in the end I saw this book as.... optimistic maybe. One thing he said stuck with me that a great ruler(one to go down in history) is not a tyrant who increases his nations size for personal gain but for the country itself. That was on my first reading, I'll reread it and maybe with more understanding I will find it as chilling as it is made out to be.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Probably. *shrug*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Flys in "is this a safehaven fir dragons?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AP World History Review I would highly recommend this book because of it's shocking truths. Many people just shrug off Machiavelli because he is associated with heartless things, giving his name a negative connotation. However, if you really dig deep into his work, you can see that by following the rules he laid out, you can sustain a government. I like how Machiavelli has a practical mindset on scenarios rather than an idealistic view. Nothing is ever going to happen the ideal way, so Machiavelli gives multiple possibilities of the same situation to better suit another person's story. If you do want to read this book, I would also recommend reading Introducing Machiavelli beforehand, so that you aren't as confused as you would be just diving in to the book. Though it is a tough read, it is definitely worth it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Machiavelli was vain, a liar, gained wealth and influence by any means. He was a key player in the government of Florence in the 15th century. Along with Medici, they were bank owners, they lent money out and got more back and broke bons doing it. He was an accosiate to the most corrupt popes in history. His interests outside himself were to preserve himself. Towards the end of his life he decided to write as to how to make it in a social class like that. A book of strategies of exploitation and coercian. I give it five stars because one cannot help but admire such a crook, and how honest he is about how he became one. True story too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GEO1300 More than 1 year ago
A "must" read for any student of human behavior.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
modernsophist More than 1 year ago
Reading this book i can understand how Niccolo machiavelli is considered the father of political science and how his observations of rulers has affected our political atmosphere. His observations and examples arise in a time were wars for power and land were prevalent and allow for a very old understanding of the different types of political principalities and how to adequately rule over them. Anyone interested in politics or history should have this in their collection
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago