The Princess Who Had No Kingdom

The Princess Who Had No Kingdom

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by Ursula Jones, Sarah Gibb
     
 

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Once there was a princess who had no kingdom. All she had was a pony and cart, and a red umbrella to keep her dry from the rain. What she lacked in wordly possessions though, she made up for in kindness, cleverness and beauty - qualities that made all the rich princes with kingdoms to spare want to marry her. But what is a kingdom without love?

Overview

Once there was a princess who had no kingdom. All she had was a pony and cart, and a red umbrella to keep her dry from the rain. What she lacked in wordly possessions though, she made up for in kindness, cleverness and beauty - qualities that made all the rich princes with kingdoms to spare want to marry her. But what is a kingdom without love?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
07/14/2014
In a fairy-tale collaboration first published in 2009 in the U.K., Jones and Gibb introduce a princess in search of her kingdom. “It must be somewhere,” she muses to her horse. Shabby but still soignée (her loveliness and balletic bearing bring to mind Audrey Hepburn) and self-reliant, the princess earns money by using her pony cart to deliver “ostrich eggs that were about to hatch or troublesome things like lame dogs or unruly grannies.” The female half of high society snubs her, and the male half is utterly infatuated, but the princess gives her heart to a penniless, clever jester who understands that, together, they can be the “Queen and King of Here, There, and Everywhere.” Gibb’s impressively elaborate silhouette scenes and full-color drawings have the cool, composed élan of 1920s fashion illustration. Though the images of the poised princess doesn’t always evince the spunk in Jones’s text—this is a girl, after all, who asks, “Do I have to do everything around here?” having all but proposed to the jester—that won’t stop readers from finding her story enchanting. Ages 4–7. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
..skill and aplomb of Ursula Jones and Sarah Gibb.—Financial Times

Will be adored.—Maternity & Infant

Such outstanding prettiness with substance is rare.—Times

Gibb's exquisite illustrations.. create a magical, fairytale atmosphere.—Child Education

Both story and pictures exude good-humoured charm.—School Librarian

An ideal book to read together with children. Sarah Gibb's illustrations suit the tone of the book perfectly.—Bookbag

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781489638823
Publisher:
Weigl Pub Inc
Publication date:
07/15/2015

Meet the Author

Ursula Jones is the author of The Witch's Children, and The Witch's Children and the Queen, winner of the 2003 Smarties Prize; both titles are illustrated by Russell Ayto. Ursula trained as an actress, and lives in France and London. Sarah Gibb is the original illustrator of the Tiara Club, and also the illustrator of numerous well-known works of fiction, including the bestsellng The Nanny Diaries. She also illustrates for greeting cards and packaging clients including Crabtree & Evelyn and Harrods. She has a degree in Graphic Design from Central St Martin's College of Art and Design and an MA in Sequential Design and Illustration form the University of Brighton. Sarah lives in London with her husband and baby son.

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The Princess Who Had No Kingdom 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Gardenseed More than 1 year ago
This is a wise and lovely modern tale in which the beautiful princess does find her kingdom in the heart of her true love. Sarah Gibb's beautiful, delicate illustrations enrich the story and make this a visually striking, scrumptious book .  This is a very enjoyable, attractive book, especially for fairy tale readers, 2-4th grades.