The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls

Overview

Fifteen-year-old Henry Holloway isn't immoral, he's just hungry. His mother died when he was nine, leaving him to be raised by his Uncle Andy and his friends, all amiable small-time crooks. When Uncle Andy is sent to prison, Henry takes up residence in an abandoned tree house in order to escape the notice of Social Services. His mission? To survive on his own while preserving his cherished independence. Fortunately, Henry possesses all the skills it takes to be a successful house burglar. Henry is an unusually ...
See more details below
Paperback
$11.77
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$12.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $6.57   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$9.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Fifteen-year-old Henry Holloway isn't immoral, he's just hungry. His mother died when he was nine, leaving him to be raised by his Uncle Andy and his friends, all amiable small-time crooks. When Uncle Andy is sent to prison, Henry takes up residence in an abandoned tree house in order to escape the notice of Social Services. His mission? To survive on his own while preserving his cherished independence. Fortunately, Henry possesses all the skills it takes to be a successful house burglar. Henry is an unusually resourceful and considerate burglar—often tidying up the places he robs—until he's caught. The terms of his probation? He must live with the Wingates, a strange family in a small town called Snowflake Falls. Henry is just getting used to his temporary family when the newly liberated Uncle Andy and his criminal friends draw him into a plan to rob the citizens of Snowflake Falls. Will Henry be loyal to his uncle or will he break with the past and do the right thing?
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Slow pacing and a frontloaded back-story undercut Lekich's (King of the Lost and Found) coming-of-age novel about a teenage thief who finds redemption. Raised by his uncle Andy in a community of minor miscreants following his mother's death, Henry learned the art of picking locks at a young age. When Andy is sent to prison, Henry avoids the foster care system by living in a tree house, surviving by breaking into neighbors' houses and stealing bits of food. Somewhat improbably, Henry's conscience won't allow him to take more than he needs, and in exchange for what he does take, he often performs light chores. Upon getting caught, Henry is sentenced to a program called Second Chances, which places him in the town of Snowflake Falls, where he is to live with the puzzling and eccentric Wingate family. The quirky, small-town characters—especially brainy, socially awkward 11-year-old Charlotte—provide lively dialogue, humor, and an opportunity for Henry to become more fully developed, but readers may tire of Henry's heavy reminiscing about his upbringing throughout the first half before the core plot comes into play. Ages 12–up. (Apr.)
The Toronto Star
"Dry humour, a slightly insane imagination and a highly personable hero make Lekich's new novel wholly refreshing...This crime comedy is made all the more entertaining by its cast of eccentric characters, but none is more winsome than Henry—who steals cars only so he can organize his thoughts; tidies the houses of those he robs; and brings a clever, comical bemusement to his own story. Delightful."
thewayofwords.com
"A book rich with simple complexities and deadpan one-liners that brilliant comics will wish they had written...This is fiction that I wish were targeted to adults. Not because the book might tempt youth to glamorize crime or emulate Holloway, but because it takes certain experience and perspective to fully appreciate its deeper meaning and elegant writing. Lekich is a writer's writer. No question....The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls reverberates with the genuine, essential stuff. Stuff that (unlike all that's mean and wrong with the world) never makes the evening news. Profound meaning can be found in the smallest gesture. Echoes of the ages resound in the philosophical, social and moral ideas...Every character is flawed but inherently noble."
Canadian Children's Book News
"Henry has a gift for understated humour and the plot is full of surprising twists and turns, sometimes solemn and sometimes very funny. Even the quirky characters—and the Wingates, in particular, are extraordinarily odd—have a refreshingly different quirkiness to them. Readers will be engaged by Henry's predicaments, his honesty (when crime isn't involved) and his unique moral code. They will certainly laugh and they might even pick up the odd security tip."
CM Magazine
"It is almost impossible not to like Henry Hollaway...Lekich has provided Henry with an engaging story and a powerful voice. He has created a novel that has both a retro feel and contemporary issues...Lekich encourages us to think we can predict what will happen and then always surprises us. While we are left unsure of Henry's next steps, we feel confident that he has a bright and happy future. Recommended."
www.thewayofwords.com
"A book rich with simple complexities and deadpan one-liners that brilliant comics will wish they had written...This is fiction that I wish were targeted to adults. Not because the book might tempt youth to glamorize crime or emulate Holloway, but because it takes certain experience and perspective to fully appreciate its deeper meaning and elegant writing. Lekich is a writer's writer. No question....The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls reverberates with the genuine, essential stuff. Stuff that (unlike all that's mean and wrong with the world) never makes the evening news. Profound meaning can be found in the smallest gesture. Echoes of the ages resound in the philosophical, social and moral ideas...Every character is flawed but inherently noble."
Sal's Fiction Addiction blog
"What a voice! With wit and a wondrous imagination John Lekich has crafted a character I will long remember and admire...As readers we meet an incredibly diverse slate of characters, unconventional and wise, empathetic to Henry's plight and gullibly welcoming to all visitors. Henry comes in contact with people who have an impact on the decisions he makes, and he is averse to hurting them. You don't want to miss meeting any of them."
Jane on Books blog
"An excellent read—funny, witty, and perfect for the young adult group...Recommended for any YA or high school library."
CanLit for Little Canadians blog
"Lekich's characters in The Prisoner of Snowflake Falls are the treasures that readers look for in great fiction. They are unique and true to themselves, good or bad, and evolving."
www.tristatereviews.blogspot.ca
"Henry will amaze young readers with his antics...With his impeccable writing skill, author John Lekich has created an antagonist who is also a protagonist. Despite his foibles, Henry is both comical and pitiful, lovable and enviable...[The book] is authentic, unpredictable and humorous. Young readers as well as old will enjoy Henry's character, the Wingates' antics, Lekich's descriptions of small-town life, and the overall message of the book."
Booklist Online
"Lekich has created a character worth caring about...For those who enjoy quirky characters and stories of redemption, this is a good bet."
Jane on Books Blog
An excellent read—funny, witty, and perfect for the young adult group...Recommended for any YA or high school library.
Tri State YA Book Review Committee
"With his impeccable writing skills, author John Lekich has created an antagonist who is also a protagonist. Despite his foibles, Henry is both comical and pitiful, lovable and enviable...There is not a 'cutsie' ending to this story. It is authentic, unpredictable and humorous. Young readers as well as old will enjoy Henry's character, the Wingates' antics, Lekich's descriptions of small-town life, and the overall message of the book."
Resource Links
"The Wingate family and the whole town of Snowflake Falls is as refreshingly quirky as the band of criminals Henry grew up with and helps keep the tone light...[Readers] will be thoroughly charmed by Henry's antics and the wacky cast of characters that populate Snowflake falls."
Staff Fiction Picks Vancouver Public Library
"Sweet-tempered and hugely enjoyable."
NJ Youth Services
"Henry is a likeable character, and readers will root for him to redeem himself."
CBC All Points West Nikki Tate-Stratton
"Full of humour, compassion, love and commitment to family. The characters are charming, funny and surprisingly complicated."
VOYA - Ava Ehde
Henry Thelonius Holloway steals to feed his habit, food in this case. Life in a tree fort makes bathing and getting meals regularly a bit difficult, so Henry uses the skills he learned from his Uncle Andy and his amiable friends, all of whom just happen to be thieves, to steal what he needs. Henry learned to pick locks and hotwire cars from the group after his mom died when he was only nine, but he is an unusual thief. He often tidies up at homes where the owner is obviously too busy to do it themselves. He also enjoys reading refrigerator notes and prescriptions, as well as family photo albums. Once, when finding a stash of cash intended for a daughter's graduation, he empathetically leaves money rather than steal it. Henry is busted after being found during a "spa" moment at a single dad's residence. His punishment is being sent off to the strange little town of Snowflake Falls to live with the unusual Wingate family, easily identifiable for their matching ugly glasses and general fear of being undercut by Biggie's Bargin Barn. This amiable tale of misadventure is a sweet, entertaining read with a good moral compass. The author has a delightful sense of playfulness and imagery, and provides many feel-good moments. The tone is light and the story sprinkled with all the usual teen angst plus that which is felt by a surprisingly moral fifteen-year-old thief. Reviewer: Ava Ehde
ALAN Review - Claire Holman
What would you do if thieves had raised you and you were homeless at age fifteen? Henry Holloway treats his "benefactors" as if he were a guest in their homes, and he loves his life and his privacy. With his mom gone to try and make an honest living, and his uncle's dishonest teachings leading to the opposite, he's happy to make ends meet on his own. This all comes to an end when he eventually gets caught, and has to make ends meet in a new town: Snowflake Falls. Henry learns through experience that gaining people's trust makes you rise to their expectations, and helps those around you find happiness in unlikely places. Lekich could not paint a more charming picture of likeable thieves. You'll find yourself rooting for the unlikeliest of heroes and wanting to watch them until the very end. Reviewer: Claire Holman
Children's Literature - Veronica Bartles
Henry Holloway is a thief. In fact, he's a really good thief. Even though he promised his mother before she died that he would not ever steal. Even though his uncle, who thought he would never get caught, is currently in jail. Even though he feels guilty every time he takes something. But Henry is hungry. And it is not easy for a kid to take care of himself when he is living on his own. So Henry compromises with his conscience. He tries not to take too much from any one person, he only takes food and the pocket change he finds lying around, and he tries not to ever steal anything that might have sentimental value for the owner. He is not in the habit of stealing people's memories, after all. But when he gets caught and sentenced to a juvenile rehabilitation program in the sleepy little town of Snowflake Falls, Henry has a chance for a new start. A rare young adult contemporary novel for boys, this book will appeal to the young men who aren't looking for a sappy romantic comedy, but who might want a book that is not science fiction or fantasy. Reviewer: Veronica Bartles
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—Fifteen-year-old Henry's mother has died; his guardian, his Uncle Andy (a very nice small-time crook), is in jail, and Henry is trying to stay out of the foster care system by making it on his own. He's living in an abandoned tree house and stealing to get by. But don't get the wrong idea. Henry is a considerate thief: cleaning houses, putting money into piggy banks, and never taking birthday cake. When he eventually gets caught, his good-natured thoughtfulness saves him from incarceration. He is sentenced to a rehabilitation program in tiny Snowflake Falls on Northern Vancouver Island. Living with a foster family, working several part-time jobs, and volunteering as a reader for a cranky old man all lead to wacky high jinks and some lessons for Henry. The first half of the book moves at a leisurely pace, establishing the teen as a truly sympathetic character despite his criminal tendencies. The second half, set in Snowflake Falls, has more action. There are plenty of amusing parts and the language, especially in scenes with Uncle Andy and his cohorts, is playful and Runyon-esque. All of the small time crooks come off as friendly old guys; there is never a hint of menace to them. This is a charming, funny coming-of-age story with terrific writing, characters to root for, and a completely satisfying ending to a silly caper.—Geri Diorio, Ridgefield Library, CT
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554699780
  • Publisher: Orca Book Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/1/2012
  • Pages: 280
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 860L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.55 (w) x 8.19 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

John Lekich is a Vancouver-based author and freelance writer whose work has appeared in such publications as Reader's Digest, the Los Angeles Times and the Hollywood Reporter. A former West Coast arts correspondent for The Globe and Mail, he is the recipient of ten regional and national magazine awards. His favorite interview subjects include Audrey Hepburn, George Plimpton, Garrison Keillor and silent screen star Lillian Gish.

John is the author of two previous young adult novels, The Losers' Club and King of the Lost and Found. He is currently working on a new novel.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Ever since I was a kid, being even a little bit hungry has given me bad dreams. The past couple of nights I've dreamed that a police car was taking me away in handcuffs. Both times I've woken up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat. This is so upsetting that I have to calm myself down by closing my eyes and visualizing the inner workings of various locks. This is a talent I learned during my advance training at the Walter Gurski School of Lock Picking. I find it very soothing during times of stress.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)